During these years of significant intellectual, emotional, and social development, PLC girls define their individual strengths and aspirations in an environment focused on both wellbeing and academic achievement.

With strong skills and understandings from the programme, the focus shifts to applying skills and understandings to support critical thinking and a broader understanding of the world around them.

Mastery of Content, Concepts and Skills

In Years 9 and 10, students learn in a concept-based, mastery-driven framework. Expert subject-based knowledge and skills are framed around deep, transferable understandings and real-life situations. Students are engaged as active participants in their learning: they select, seek out and master content, skills and understandings in the pursuit of excellence in their chosen fields and interests.

Learning is refined through a cycle of formative assessment and knowledge/skills development. Assessment is not just of learning, but also for learning. Students are able to access course content and feedback in a way that gives them more control over their own learning. Feedback is recorded and presented to students and parents in such a way to maximise students’ ability to improve their performance, rather than simply acknowledging it.

Click the drop-down options below to find out more about the varied subjects on offer.

Year 9 Electives

Dance

Semester Unit

In Year 9 Dance, students will develop, create, explore, analyse, reflect and perform. Students will explore and choreograph dances by manipulating and combining the elements of dance, choreographic devices, and production elements to communicate choreographic intent. They will learn dances and sequences, demonstrating technical and expressive skills appropriate to the genre and style. Students will also evaluate the impact of dance from different cultures, places and times and reflect on their own and others work. This unit culminates in the preparation of a performance piece for Performing Arts Showcase.

Year-Long Unit

Within this course students study technique in different styles and choreograph dances by manipulating and combining the elements of dance, choreographic devices, form and production elements to communicate their choreographic intent. In groups they choreograph, rehearse and perform dances, demonstrating technical and expressive skills appropriate to the genre and style. Students understand the importance of safe dance practice and evaluate the impact of dance from different places and times on Australian dance. At the end of each semester students will perform at PLC’s bi-annual Performing Arts Showcase.
This course will allow students to:

  • build on their awareness of the body and how it is used in particular dance styles
  • learn new movement skills to include dance style-specific skills
  • extend technical skills from the previous year, increasing their confidence, accuracy, clarity of movement and projection
  • reflect on their own and others work
  • explore meaning and interpretation, form and elements within professional choreographers’ works
  • understand that safe dance practices underlie all experiences in the study of dance
  • perform within their own body capabilities and work safely in groups.
Digital Technologies

Digital Creations 

Semester Unit

Course Overview: A semester course providing students with an opportunity to explore and be creative in a digital space. A focus on developing digital and problem-solving skills.

It is a practical, project-based course with a focus on students having the freedom to choose from a wide variety of topics. Topics could include but are not limited to:

  • Embedding LEDs into clothing/devices
  • 3D modelling and printing
  • Minecraft coding

Throughout the course students are encouraged to experiment with building and extending skills with technologies to create and solve problems. Students will have the opportunity to to create products that can be taken home during the semester.

Year-Long Unit

Course Overview: A year long course providing students with an opportunity to explore and be creative in a digital space. A focus on developing digital and problem-solving skills, that can be applied to real-world problems.

It is a practical, project-based course with a focus on students having the freedom to choose from a wide variety of topics. Topics could include but are not limited to:

  • Image creation using Adobe Illustrator
  • Image manipulation using Adobe Photoshop
  • Creating an escape room
  • 3D modelling and printing
  • Lego robotics
  • Designing, building, and coding drones

Throughout the course students are encouraged to experiment with building and extending skills with technologies to create and solve problems. Students will have the opportunity to to create products that can be taken home during the year.

Drama

In Year 9, Drama students will be given opportunities to refine their knowledge and skills to present drama as an event safely using processes, techniques and conventions of drama. Students develop drama based on devised drama processes and appropriate, published script excerpts using selected drama forms and styles. Student work in devised and scripted drama focuses on reflective and responsive processes supported through scaffolded frameworks using drama terminology and language. 

Semester Unit – Semester 1

Throughout the first half of the semester, students will study the dramatic form and style of Commedia Dell’Arte. Students will look at the basis of stock characters and physicality and how they can be used to communicate a story to an audience effectively.

During the second half of the semester, students will work in groups of between two and six performers to devise and perform an original piece of drama based on a given stimulus. The piece should last approximately 6 minutes.  Students must use various staging techniques e.g. lights, sound, set and costume to support their performance.

Semester Unit – Semester 2

Throughout the first half of the semester, students will undertake a practical analysis of a script. Students will explore how the creative team including actors, directors, sound, costume, set and lighting designers would approach a script from initial vision concepts to performance reality.

During the second half of the semester, students will study the dramatic form and style of Melodrama and its importance in the lead-up to Naturalism by Konstantin Stanislavski. Students will understand the importance of themes and how adding music as a creative aid to develop the emotional values of scenes.

Year-Long Course

Term 1: Physical Theatre

Throughout this unit, students will study various physical skills associated with this dramatic style and form. These include lifts, floor work, mime, mask work, and chorus work. Students will be required to devise a scene on a theme of their choice that highlights the skills taught.    

Term 2: Script Analysis 

During this unit, students will study and analyse the script “The Exam” by Andy Hamilton and through classroom practical explorations will gain an in-depth idea of the playwrights’ intentions to perform the characters as intended. Students should through their practical exploration gain a deeper understanding of a range of dramatic techniques that will enable them to do this.    

Term 3: Abstract Theatre (Presentational Theatre) 

Using Edgar Allan Poe’s Story “The Tell-Tale Heart,” students will develop abstract skills to reinterpret the story in their own devised version. Students will be introduced to lighting and sound elements in this unit and will have to take on a creative role in the realisation of their performance.    

Term 4: Scripted Performance 

Students will study a script and will create a classroom performance of the script. Using skills covered throughout the year students will be required to take leadership of their performance, incorporating design features such as lighting, sound, costume and set design. The script for this unit changes from year to year. Previous texts have included “FAST”“The Mobile Phone Show” and “The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time”. 

 

Enrichment

The Year 9 Enrichment programme is offered to students who require additional support with their literacy and numeracy skills.

The programme runs parallel to the English and Mathematics syllabus by providing additional support in reading comprehension, punctuation, grammar, and text level writing for English, and computational skills in Mathematics.

Students continue to prepare for Year 9 NAPLAN and receive ongoing support with assessments for English and Mathematics.

Students who previously studied Year 8 Enrichment are encouraged to continue in this course of study.

Food Science

Food Truck Taste Sensations

Semester Unit

This course will give students an opportunity to experience the creative aspects of foods. It is a practical based course with a focus on collaborative learning that caters for girls who enjoy learning in a hands-on, creative environment.

They will develop and refine their food preparation skills by cooking a wide range of meals and snacks. This knowledge and experience will enable and empower them to design and produce their own menu item for a food truck.

The girls will also prepare a variety of preserved products, while learning how to make food last. They will craft a scrumptious hamper to take home at the end of semester.

Flavour of Food

Year-Long Unit

This year long course will give students an opportunity to experience the creative aspects of foods. It is a practical based course with a focus on collaborative learning that caters for girls who enjoy learning in a hands-on, creative environment.

They will develop and refine their food preparation skills by cooking a wide range of meals. This knowledge and experience will enable and empower them to design or choose their own recipes and produce meals to impress.

Futures Thinking

In Year 9 Futures Thinking, students will learn and apply critical thinking and problem-solving skills by exploring ideas across a range of topics. Lessons will be divided between the Future Problem Solving Australia programme and ethics, in conjunction with the Association for Philosophy In Schools (APIS).

Future Problem Solving focuses on sustainability and the role of technology in addressing the challenges of the future. More information on the topics in 2023 can be found here. Ethics will introduce the foundation skills for critical thinking and argument and give students strategies for inquiry.

Futures Thinking will use collaborative learning to position students to succeed in a range of extension programmes and opportunities in their learning journeys. This will include a range of game theory and preparation for external academic competitions such as the da Vinci Decathlon, Tournament of Minds, World Scholars Cup, and Ethics Olympiad.

Futures Thinking has been designed to provide academic extension to compliment the Year 9 curriculum in core subjects.

Student information:

The Futures Thinking course will cover:

About half the lessons will be used for the Future Problem Solving Australia programme that teaches students problem-solving skills. Students will be introduced to a 6-step process for approaching problem-solving and then will refine these skills through set topics:

  •  e-waste
  •  Digital realities
  •  Robotic workforce
  •  Throwaway society

The remaining lessons will be divided between:

Learning the foundations to formal logic and ethics. This will be done using material from the Ethics Olympiad and Philosothon competitions and the Philosophy faculty at UWA.

Learning about game theory which gives them strategies to approach games such as chess. These are practical applications of thinking strategies that are useful in a range of subjects throughout education.

Some lessons will be used to prepare students participating in academic competitions such as the da Vinci Decathlon, and World Scholars Cup competitions, depending on which semester students are enrolled in.

Languages - Chinese / French

Chinese Second Language

The Year 9 Chinese as a second language course builds on the skills, knowledge and understandings required of students to communicate in the Chinese language developed in Year 8.  The course focuses on extending students’ oral and written communication skills and their understanding of Chinese language and culture. They are increasingly aware of their personal and social worlds and are engaging with youth-related issues.  As such, we have catered for our Year 9 students by including topics that are relevant to teenagers. Students will be provided with authentic learning materials and are supported by personalised scaffolding.  Learning will also be supplemented with cultural experiences such as viewing of Chinese films, and outings and excursions, when permitted.

Specifically, we will cover the following four topics.

Term 1: we will look at student life in China and Australia (学生生活)

Students learn about a typical day in the life of a Chinese student and learn relevant vocabulary, expressions and grammar to be able to discuss and describe their own daily routine at home and at school. Students reflect on the similarities and differences between daily routine in Australia and China.

Term 2: we will look at the importance of friendship (我的朋友)

Students will reflect on the role and impact of friendship in their lives and learn relevant vocabulary, expressions and grammar to be able to describe their friends and express their opinions about friendship.

Term 3: we will look at healthy life styles (健康生活方式)

Students will look at the impact of health lifestyles in their lives and learn relevant vocabulary, expressions and grammar to be able to talk about healthy habits and make suggestions about improving one’s health. Students reflect on the similarities and differences between lifestyles in Australia and China.

Term 4: we will discuss childhood memories and making connections with the past (我的童年)

Students will look at the activities/hobbies they used to do when younger and compare and contrast these to the activities they enjoy doing now. We will explore how the activities of Chinese children might differ to what is done in Australia and consider the reasons as to why this may be the case.

French Second Language

At this level, we anticipate students will bring existing knowledge of language and culture, as well as a range of learning strategies, to their studies of French. They are increasingly aware of the world beyond their own and are engaging with youth-related and social and environmental issues.  Consequently, we have catered the course in Year 9 to include topics that are relevant to teenagers by exposing them to a range of authentic materials designed for or generated by young French speakers in France and other francophone regions.  Learning will be supplemented with cultural experiences such as the viewing of French films, and outings and excursions, where permitted.

Specifically, we will cover the following four units.

Term 1: we will look at fashion and clothing in France and Australia (La mode)

Studens will explore the concept of clothing as a means of self-expression and identity and discuss fashion trends in France and Australia.  Students will build upon prior knowledge to describe what they wear on certain occasions and will look at how French fashion designers have influenced and shaped the world in which we live.

Term 2: we will look at the importance of family and daily life (Ma vie quotidienne)

Students learn about a typical day in the life of a French student and learn relevant vocabulary, expressions and grammar to be able to discuss and describe their own daily routine at home and at school. Students reflect on the similarities and differences between daily routine in Australia and France.

Term 3: we will look at mobile phones and new technologies (Le portable)

Students will reflect on the role and impact of technologies in their lives and in the lives of young people in French-speaking communities.

Term 4: we will discuss childhood memories and making connections with the past (Mon enfance)

Students will look at the activities they used to do when younger and compare and contrast these to the activities they enjoy doing now.  We will explore how the activities of Francophone children might differ to what is done in Australia and consider the reasons as to why this may be the case.

Materials, Design and Technology

Semester Unit

Students will make two or three projects throughout the semester.

The first project is one designed to develop skills and confidence with hand tools and machinery. The construction of set projects introduces the students to collaborative learning and safe practices within the workshop. Projects – retro stool.

The second innovative project is in the form of a desk lamp. The emphasis is on applying and developing their skills as well as an awareness of the workshop and new technologies ie. Domino cutter and laser engraver. Students are encouraged to create their own design for their desk lamp to suit a specific purpose.

Students are also given the opportunity to use the wood lathe, creating a wooden pen.

Media

Film, Television and Photography

Semester Unit: Reality Television, Social Media, and Studio Photography

A focus on reality television, self-promotion in social media and manipulation in studio photography. This unit will explore the way that audiences are led to perceive that what we engage with is “real” rather than constructed for promotional purposes and entertainment value.

Students will analyse and create their own reality television formats, and learn how to edit “reels” as well as generate Tik Tok inspired content.

Course learning contexts include a combination of the following:

  • Popular television programs and genres
  • CapCut for editing social media inspired content
  • Studio photography and filmmaking skills

Students are introduced to Adobe Premiere Pro, Photoshop, and Lightroom for editing their production work, as well as filming and capturing images with a selection of manual DSLR Camera settings.

Year-long Unit: Teen Films and Fashion Photography

Course Overview: A focus on fashion photography and teen cinema classics. Students will engage with commercial fashion and studio photography techniques. From fashion photography, then to teen films in the latter half of the unit where students will explore iconic Hollywood teen films including Mean Girls, Bring it On, Clueless, 10 Things I Hate About You, Ferris Bueller’s Day Off, and The Breakfast Club.

Students will analyse and create their “teen flick” influenced films and capture fashion inspired images for print and exhibition purposes.

Course learning contexts include a combination of the following:

  • Studio photography and filmmaking skills
  • Popular Hollywood Cinema and Teen Genre Conventions
  • Fashion Photography and Magazines

Students are introduced to Adobe Premiere Pro, Photoshop, and Lightroom for editing their production work, as well as filming and capturing images with a selection of manual DSLR Camera settings.

 

 

 

Music

The Year 9 course enables students to build on music skills and knowledge across a range of performing, composing, aural and listening activities. The performance component is weighted at 50%, each student choosing their instrument of study (can be two instruments and includes voice). As such, students who select Music will be undertaking weekly instrumental/voice lessons and participate in a School music group. The performance component comprises solo and group performances, assessed against each student’s level of experience and the standard of the piece selected by the student.

Students will experience, analyse and create a range of different music from Schubert to Sondheim to Swift and beyond. In line with the newly revised Year 11/12 ATAR and IB Music courses, there will be equal opportunity to experience music from Western Art, Jazz and Contemporary styles. Drawing on these different styles, students continue to develop aural skills, will compose works and analyse pieces such as Beethoven’s classic 5th Symphony, Duke Ellington’s ‘Take The A Train’ and The Beatles hit, ‘Can’t Buy Me Love’. Using the elements of music, they examine similarities and differences between musical works and identify cultural, historical and stylistic features.

* In Year 9, students may choose to study Music in both semesters, developing further their skills in aural, analysis, performance and composition. This is recommended for students who wish to study ATAR or IB Music.

Outdoor Recreation

Sport and Recreation

Semester Unit

The Sport Education and Recreation unit covers a wide variety of activities with the emphasis on participation, improvement in fitness levels and skill development. The main aims of the course are to encourage leadership, teamwork, active participation and to foster an interest which may lead to enjoyable recreation pursuits later on in life.

Students are given the opportunity of fulfilling roles such as umpiring, organising fixtures, acting as a team coach, captain or manager and inventing games. They participate in a wide range of activities including peer teaching, water games including Water Polo, Indoor Soccer, Outdoor Volleyball, modified Football and European Handball.

Outdoor Pursuits and Sporting Experiences

Year-Long Unit

This unit will give students the opportunity to explore and navigate both outdoor recreational pursuits and alternative sporting experiences in an array of challenging environments.

The course will expose them to a wide spectrum of activities, for example snorkelling, surfing, orienteering, trampolining and other popular community sports.

The unit challenges perceptions and encourages students to engage in activities that give them experiences and skills beyond mainstream sports.

A variety of guest presenters and excursions are an essential part of the course.

Physical Education and Sport

The PE and Health course includes health and fitness, individual and team sports. The courses aim to foster a positive attitude toward physical activity to promote a healthy and active lifestyle.

Physical Education

Physical Education courses are delivered as units of inquiry and through the   philosophy of concept-based teaching and learning. The focus in Years 9 is on the execution of skills in competitive contexts and transferring strategies across sports. Courses are aimed at providing students with knowledge of specific motor skills through participation in a wide range of activities. Skills involving hand-eye co-ordination, general body co-ordination and components of fitness will be developed. The rules and general principles of team play will be introduced to allow the girls to participate in matches at Inter-School or social and recreational levels.

Students are assessed in the following:

  1. Performing and Applying (50%) – Performance of individual skills and skills in competitive contexts. (Practical)
  2. Understanding Movement (25%) – Communicating understanding and problem solving. (Theory)
  3. Learning through Movement (25%) – Planning for performance and interpersonal skills. (Practical/Theory)

Students will have the opportunity to participate in activities including:

Water Polo • Lifesaving • Basketball • Soccer • Rhythmic Gymnastics • Yoga • Coaching • Tournament Play • Games

Health

The aim of the Health programme is to allow students to construct their own understanding of health and well-being issues within a factual framework through a broad range of activities. Students will develop skills in assertiveness, risk assessment, self-esteem building, decision-making, critical thinking, peer resistance, self-monitoring and communication. A variety of guest presenters enhance the understanding of the course.

Textiles

Semester Unit

The focus of this unit will be on making garments for themselves. Students will build on the practical skills developed in Year 8, including more advanced skills in garment construction, and the handling of woven and stretch-knit fabrics. Through the Technology Process, they will research and investigate a variety of design components and a range of fabrics and finishing techniques, working towards creating individual garments for themselves. Students will also complete samples of techniques used in garment construction.

Year-Long Unit

Unit 1: A Cut Above *prior experience preferred but not compulsory

Content

The focus of this unit is on creating clothing for yourself that is a cut above the rest. Clothing not only looks better but also fits better. Styles will not be restricted by colour or fashion trends you do not like.

This course is designed for students with skills and knowledge gained during years 7,8 and 9, to build on those skills whilst still catering to those who are less experienced. Students will study fashion trends and eras of fashion in order to create a unique outfit for themselves.

Designs will be created to suit a client’s needs and students will learn to present rapid-fire sketches and storyboards to showcase their ideas.

They will use a range of materials, recycled items of clothing, machines, and skills, to cut patterns and construct and evaluate the items they make.

Design Project:

An outfit featuring one of the following decorative techniques:

  • Hand embroidery
  • Appliqué
  • Freehand machine embroidery
  • Beading
  • Sewing with Coke cans

Unit 2: Leisure Wear with Flair

*No prior experience necessary

Content

The focus of this course is on creating fashionable leisure clothing.

This course is designed to build new skills while still catering to students less familiar with the studio. Students will design and create a fashionable 2 piece leisure wear outfit for themselves.

They will complete a fun skills project which will culminate in making a useful item for themselves.

Outfits can include a recycled component as well as the construction of a new garment.

Individuality is encouraged.

Design Project

An outfit featuring a decorative technique.
Possible garments:

  • Linen pants
  • Sweatpants
  • Cropped tops with eyelets
  • Long line tops
  • Skirts: linen, long line, mini, dropped waist, high waist
  • Shorts: linen or sweatpants
  • Dress
Visual Arts

Year 10 Electives

Dance

Within this course students study technique in different styles and explore the choreographer’s use of the elements of dance, choreographic devices, form and production elements to communicate choreographic intent in dances they make, perform and view. They analyse and evaluate the work of professional choreographers both past and present and build on choreography, rehearsal, technical and presentation skills appropriate to the genre and style. Students will understand how the body works and how it moves. Anatomical awareness including the study of skeletal and muscular systems as well as safe dance practice. Within this unit students will perform at PLC’s annual Dance Showcase and be provided the opportunity to attend performances at both professional theatres and in-school performances.
This course will allow students to:

  • build on their awareness of the body and how it is used in particular dance styles
  • extend the combinations of fundamental movement skills to include style-specific movement skills
  • extend technical skills from the previous year, increasing their confidence, accuracy, clarity of movement and projection
  • reflect on the development of traditional and contemporary styles of dance and how choreographers can be identified through the style of their choreography
  • explore meaning and interpretation, forms and elements, and social, cultural and historical contexts of dance as they make and respond to dance
  • understand that safe dance practices underlie all experiences in the study of dance
  • perform within their own body capabilities and work safely in groups.
Drama

Aims of the Course:

  • Develop students’ understanding of drama through practical and theoretical study
  • Enable students to understand the role of actor, director, and designer in creating a piece of theatre
  • Develop students’ acting skills, both individually and in groups
  • Enable students to develop their skills in devising original drama
  • Help students communicate feelings and ideas to an audience
  • Foster understanding of the performance process enabling students to evaluate the various stages of that process and encourage enjoyment of drama.

Content Overview:

  • Extended extracts from published plays
  • Stimuli (short titles, poems, pictures, songs, historical events, stories) for devising dramatic pieces
  • Students’ own choice of dramatic repertoire dramatic material of their own devising

Term 1: Devising Theatre

Students will work in groups of between two and six performers to devise and perform an original piece of drama based on a stimulus. The piece should last approximately 10 minutes.  Students must use various staging techniques, e.g. lights, sound, set and costume.

Term 2: Acting Approaches

Students will study different approaches to acting, from realism to the absurd.

Term 3: Group Text-based Performance

As a class, students may either devise their own play to perform or take part in a performance of a pre-existing script. Students will study the context of their devised piece/chosen script to understand the practical performance aspects of production and its technical requirements, e g. lights, sound, set and costume.

Enrichment

Year 10 Enrichment course is offered to students who require additional support with their literacy and numeracy skills.

The programme is structured to coincide with the Year 10 English and Mathematics syllabus and aims to consolidate reading comprehension and writing skills in English, and computational skills in Mathematics.

Additional support is provided for the completion of homework and assessments tasks, as well as on-going support for OLNA.

Students who previously studied Year 9 Enrichment are encouraged to continue in this course of study.

Food Science

Part 1

This course extends Year 10 students, taking them into the exciting world of food fashion where they can often eat their own assessments.

Students will explore more inventive skills in food preparation and presentation; this experience is an ideal prequel to Year 11 Food Science & Technology.

Travelling with your Tastebuds

Part 2

Students will have the opportunity to develop their skills and creative flair in the preparation and presentation of food.

They will build on their knowledge of nutrition and develop an awareness of common misconceptions facing the everyday consumer.

They will investigate the cuisine of different cultures and how this influences the food patterns and choices of the community.

Languages - Chinese / French

Chinese Second Language

The Year 10 Chinese as a second language course builds on the skills, knowledge and understandings required of students to communicate in the Chinese language developed in Year 9.  The course focuses on extending their oral and written communication skills and their understanding of Chinese language and culture. They are increasingly aware of their personal, natural and social worlds. As such, we have catered for our Year 10 students by including topics that are relevant to young people’s experiences and interest in contemporary culture and social issues. Students will be provided with new challenges, authentic learning and intercultural experiences and are supported by personalised scaffolding.  Learning will also be supplemented with cultural experiences such as viewing of Chinese films, and outings and excursions, when permitted.

This course will prepare students for Year 11 Chinese, whether you choose IB or WACE.

Specifically, we will cover the following four topics.

Term 1: we will look at technology (科技的影响) 

Students will reflect on the role and impact of technologies in their lives and in the lives of young people in Chinese-speaking communities.

Term 2: we will look at the family relationships and influential people in life  (对我有影响的人)

Students will reflect on the role and impact of family relationships and influential people in their lives and learn relevant vocabulary, expressions and grammar to be able to express their opinions about these close connections.

Term 3: we will look at learning Chinese and future job pathways (中文学习和未来)

Students will reflect on their Chinese language learning experience and its potential impact on their future plans, opportunities and job pathways. How might my study of Chinese language benefit me in my future endeavours?  Students will learn to express relevant vocabulary, expressions and grammar to be able to describe how their Chinese language acquisition and cultural understandings broaden their worldview.

French Second Language

At this level, we anticipate students will bring existing knowledge of language and culture, as well as a range of learning strategies, to their studies of French. They are increasingly aware of the world beyond their own and are engaging with youth-related and social and environmental issues.  Consequently, we have catered the course in Year 10 to include topics that are relevant to teenagers by exposing them to a range of authentic materials designed for or generated by young French speakers in France and other francophone regions.  The Year 10 course will provide the foundations for the study of French in Upper School by refining communication skills and the knowledge of how the language works.

Learning will be supplemented with cultural experiences such as the viewing of French films, and outings and excursions, where permitted.

Specifically, we will cover the following three units.

Term 1: we will look at French Cinema (Le cinéma français).

Students will explore various topics, such as self-identity and the complexities of relationships through the medium of film.  Students will investigate and learn more about French film festivals and explore the changing place of cinema in both French and Australian teenagers’ lives

Term 2: we will look at future plans (Moi et mon avenir)

Students will discuss their current interests and hobbies and how these might influence subject choices and career options.  Students will reflect on how their personal attributes can shape their relationships and will consider what life will be like when they are older.

Term 3: we will look at everyday essential French (Le français essentiel)

Students will become familiar with expressions and vocabulary relating to everyday situations they may face when travelling in Francophone countries, such as going to the doctor, pharmacy or staying in a hotel.  Students will discuss upcoming plans for holidays, taking into consideration what can go wrong when overseas.

Materials, Design and Technology

*prior experience preferred but not compulsory.

Content

The aim is to provide opportunities for the students to develop existing skills & knowledge and take it to another level. Students who are interested in exploring what it means to be a product designer. This will include using a range of materials, tools and machines, and practical skills, to produce practical projects with various materials.

The students will also be to using the “design process” in which they will develop a design brief and a design project. The brief requires that they seek a “client’s” requirements; explore existing products; develop limitations, development of design ideas using rapid sketches & drawings; select appropriate materials; production of their own design & reflection.

Develop an understanding of what is required when communicating a working drawing to be used for manufacture. Use of CAD software sketch. Activities may also involve peer teaching primary students.

Design Project

Create a stool to suit a particular need in your family home. Whether it be in the kitchen, bedroom, games room or music room.

Consider your prior experience and the available materials. Explore additional features such as foot rests and/or shelf 

*Fusion 360 

*Peer teaching Primary students 

Projects

  • Kitchen stool
  • Side table
  • Jewellery box
  • Wood turning 

*additional projects 

Salt and pepper mill on wood lathe

Music

Students extend and consolidate music skills and knowledge across a range of performing, composing, aural and analysis activities. The performance component is weighted at 50%, each student choosing their instrument of study (can be two instruments and includes voice). As such, students who select Music will be undertaking weekly instrumental/voice lessons and participate in a School music group. The performance component comprises solo and group performances, assessed against each student’s level of experience, the standard of the piece selected by the student and the performance standards as outlined by SCSA in the Year 10 Music syllabus. Students practise and perform a wider range of solo and ensemble repertoire developing and consolidating technical skills, expression and stylistic integrity. Students explore their emerging personal style and music ideas when composing and arranging, using the Sibelius music writing software provided.

Students build on their understanding of meaning and interpretation in musical works, using aural and critical analysis skills to compare and evaluate a range of Western Art, Jazz and Contemporary music, drawing upon knowledge of previously studied works. They use scores and music terminology to analyse and evaluate the use of the elements of music within a musical style and identify and discuss social, cultural and historical factors.

Media - Photography and Film Studies

Film, Television and Photography

The comprehensive year-long media studies course offers an exciting exploration of film, television, and photography. With a strong focus on practical skills, students will delve into the captivating world of iconic filmmakers, Hollywood genres, innovative television productions, and the art of photography.

Film and Television Focus: In this unit, students will immerse themselves in an in-depth study of renowned filmmakers, analysing their distinctive styles and narrative techniques. From the mind-bending thrills of Inception to the gripping intensity of The Dark Knight and the whimsical beauty of Edward Scissorhands, students will dissect and discuss an array of iconic films. Furthermore, we will explore ground-breaking television productions such as Stranger Things and Wednesday, examining their unique storytelling approaches and their innovative visual style.

Students will have the exciting opportunity to put their knowledge into action by creating their own stylized scenes and short films. Through hands-on experience, they will develop skills in writing, filming, and editing, gaining practical insights into the art of visual storytelling.

Photography Focus: The photography segment of our course builds upon students’ existing camera skills. Through various exercises and projects, students will experiment with studio production techniques, learning to manipulate lighting, composition, and props to convey different moods and narratives. Additionally, we will venture beyond the studio, exploring diverse locations and honing our ability to capture the essence of a place through the lens.

Course learning contexts include a combination of the following:

  • Hollywood film and independent director style
  • Iconic films and innovative television productions
  • Studio and location photography
  • Magazine design, studio portraiture and fashion photography.

Students will use Adobe Premiere Pro and Photoshop for editing their production work, as well as filming and capturing images with a selection of manual DSLR Camera settings.

By the end of the year, participants will have not only expanded their knowledge of film, television, and photography but also developed a portfolio of their own creative works.

Outdoor Recreation

In this unit, students investigate the Elements of Risk (perceived, real and social) and the concept of Challenge in outdoor recreational pursuits. The unit is primarily practical activity, however, includes theory based sessions to conduct activity introductions, planning and risk assessments. 

Students will be assessed on their: 

  1. Skill development 
  2. Ability to plan and evaluate 
  3. Awareness and adherence to safety procedures 

Aquatics 

  • Snorkelling (pool / river / beach) 
  • Paddling (river) 
  • Stand paddle boarding (river) 
  • Surfing (beach) 

Land Based 

  • 1st Aid (school) 
  • Trangia cooking (school) 
  • Walking (Mosman Park)  
  • Rock climbing (Peppermint Grove / Fremantle 
  • Snow safety 
Physical and Health Education

Physical Education

Physical Education courses are delivered as units of inquiry and through the   philosophy of concept-based teaching and learning. The focus in Years 9 and 10 is on the execution of skills in competitive contexts and transferring strategies across sports. Courses are aimed at providing students with knowledge of specific motor skills through participation in a wide range of activities. Skills involving hand-eye co-ordination, general body co-ordination and components of fitness will be developed. The rules and general principles of team play will be introduced to allow the girls to participate in matches at Inter-School or social and recreational levels.

Students are assessed in the following:

  1. Performing and Applying (50%) – Performance of individual skills and skills in competitive contexts. (Practical)
  2. Understanding Movement (25%) – Communicating understanding and problem solving. (Theory)
  3. Learning through Movement (25%) – Planning for performance and interpersonal skills. (Practical/Theory)

Students will have the opportunity to participate in activities including:

Water Polo • Lifesaving • Basketball • Soccer • Rhythmic Gymnastics • Yoga • Coaching • Tournament Play • Games

Health

The aim of the Health programme is to allow students to construct their own understanding of health and well-being issues within a factual framework through a broad range of activities. Students will develop skills in assertiveness, risk assessment, self-esteem building, decision-making, critical thinking, peer resistance, self-monitoring and communication. A variety of guest presenters enhance the understanding of the course.

The topics covered in Year 10 include:

  • Relationships: gender issues, sexual decisions, dilemmas.
  • Safety: sexual harassment, sexual assault, consent, healthy romantic relationships, my body
  • Mental Health: stress, healthy lifestyles, positive thinking.
  • HIV/AIDS: knowledge, values clarification, safe behaviour and practices, attitudes, strategies for positive change.
  • Sexual Health: STIs, contraception.
  • Drugs: Club drugs, Ecstacy, Ice, Heroin, Cocaine

Students are assessed in the following:

    1. Being healthy, safe and active (50%) – Semester 1 Assignment
    2. Communicating and interacting for health and wellbeing; Contributing to healthy and active communities (50%) – Semester 2 Assignment
Technologies - Digital Creations

Course Overview: A year-long course providing students with an opportunity to explore and be creative in a digital space. A focus on developing digital and problem-solving skills, that can be applied to real-world problems.

It is a practical, project-based course with a focus on students having the freedom to choose from a wide variety of topics. Topics could include but are not limited to:

  • Image creation using Adobe Illustrator
  • Image manipulation using Adobe Photoshop
  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Augmented Reality
  • App development
  • Ethical hacking
  • Website development

Throughout the course students are encouraged to experiment with building and extending skills with technologies to create and solve problems. Students will have the opportunity to to create products that can be taken home during the year.

Textiles

Unit 1: A Cut Above

*prior experience preferred but not compulsory

Content

The focus of this unit is on creating clothing for yourself that is a cut above the rest. Clothing  not only look better but also  fit better. Styles will not be restricted by colour or fashion trends you do not like.

This course is designed for students with skills and knowledge gained during years 7,8 and 9, to build on those skills whilst still catering for those who are less experienced. Students will study fashion trends and eras of fashion in order to create a unique outfit for themselves.

Designs will be created to suit a client’s needs and students will learn to present rapid fire sketches and storyboards to showcase their ideas.

They will use a range of materials, recycled items of clothing, machines and skills, to cut patterns and construct and evaluate the items they make.

Design Project:

An outfit featuring one of the following decorative techniques:

  • Hand embroidery
  • Appliqué
  • Free hand machine embroidery
  • Beading
  • Sewing with coke cans

Unit 2: Leisure Wear with Flair

*No prior experience necessary

Content

The focus of this course is on creating fashionable leisure clothing.

This course is designed to build new skills while still catering for students less familiar with the studio. Students will design and create a fashionable 2 piece leisure wear outfit for themselves.

They will complete a fun skills project which will culminate in making a useful item for themselves.

Outfits can include a recycled component as well as the construction of a new garment.

Individuality is encouraged.

Design Project

An outfit featuring a decorative technique.
Possible garments:

    • Linen pants
    • Sweatpants
    • Cropped tops with eyelets
    • Long line tops
    • Skirts: linen, long line, mini, dropped waist, high waist
    • Shorts: linen or sweat pants
    • Dress

 

Visual Art

Year 10 Visual Art Unit 1

Semester 1

Content: Drawing & Sculpture

This is a dynamic and stimulating course which progressively builds skills and competence in art practice.

Students will gain inspiration through the exploration of contemporary themes. Students will consider how art can and does communicate personal ideas.

 

A study of contemporary artists and artworks, that work with unconventional materials, will provide stimulus for ideas and art making.

A combination of drawing, textiles and sculptural forms will be explored in the development of a body of work and resolved sculptural artwork. 

Studio Project

Students will develop drawing skills using a range of creative mediums such as charcoal, coloured chalks and ink.

Students will explore innovative techniques to manipulate materials, creating an original sculptural form that expresses their point of view.

Year 10 Visual Art Unit 2

Semester 2

Content: Drawing and Painting/Printmaking

This is a dynamic and stimulating course that progressively builds skills and competence in art practice. By developing an appreciation of the art world, students acquire skills to produce contemporary artwork.

Students will be inspired by the painting techniques of a range of artists both traditional and contemporary.

Studio Project

Students will explore a range of creative media including collage, painting, drawing and writing to express a response to different environments.

Students will investigate a range of different painting techniques and mediums to express personal stories and experiences that relate to landscapes and a Sense of Place.

 

Master Course – 3 Terms

Content

The year-long units have been designed to develop and refine students’ skills in a range of studio areas. This will include exploration into 2D and 3D studio areas, with opportunities to combine them. Students will engage in viewing art in real life through excursions to relevant exhibitions.

Students will develop a sophisticated understanding of the arts throughout history and within contemporary society.

The course is designed to prepare you, and as a pathway for ATAR or General 11&12 and Diploma Year 1 & 2 Visual Art courses

  • Students will engage in drawing, painting, and sculptural technique skill-building.
  • The two main projects are given more time so that students can explore their own ideas and have more time to refine their technical skills
  • They will conceptually explore ideas that could include concepts such as; identity and portraiture, metamorphosis, a sense of place, and collections
  • Emphasis is placed on developing a rich body of visual and theoretical investigations within their Art Journal. This is how many professional artists develop their ideas and explore techniques.
  • The course will help students to develop independent inquiry skills and give them more autonomy in the exploration of their own personal style and techniques

You may attend excursions to relevant exhibitions like; Sculpture by the Sea, and contemporary galleries such as the Lawrence Wilson Art Gallery, AGWA and PICA, in the city.

Studio Project

  1. 3D ART Forms

This could include a range of mixed media assemblage, clay sculpture, and wearable art.

  1. 2D ART Forms

This will include a range of drawing and painting art forms