The WACE ATAR Pathway applies to a student who studies a minimum of eight paired ATAR course units (four ATAR subjects) in Year 12. This pathway may comprise a variety of subject options with the aim of suiting the academic needs and interests of the student whilst ensuring they meet requirements for WACE graduation and entrance into tertiary study, be that university, TAFE, an Apprenticeship or the workforce.

In Year 11, students must select an English course (preferably ATAR) and then choose five additional subjects that can be either ATAR or General subjects, so long as there are a minimum of eight paired ATAR course units (four ATAR subjects).

In Year 12, students must select an English course (preferably ATAR) and then choose five or four additional subjects that can be either ATAR or General subjects, so long as there are a minimum of eight paired ATAR course units (four ATAR subjects).

It is important to note, in Year 12, subjects must be taken as a pair of units – change between semesters is not permitted.

Whilst the study of an English course is the only mandatory subject to achieve one’s WACE, English does not need to be included in the calculation of the ATAR.

Calculation of the ATAR

An ATAR ranges from 99.95 to zero, and reports your rank position relative to all other students. It takes into account the number of students who sit the WACE examinations in any year and also the number of people of Year 12 school leaving age in the total population.

The ATAR allows the results of any WA student applying for university admission interstate to be directly compared with results in other states.

The ATAR is calculated from the Tertiary Entrance Aggregate (TEA).

Tertiary Entrance Aggregate (TEA)

The TEA is the sum of a student’s best four scaled scores based on the following rules:

  • You can accumulate the scaled scores which contribute to your TEA over five consecutive years, but you can only count any subject once. If you repeat a subject, the best score in that subject is used.
  • There are some unacceptable course combinations (eg Mathematics Applications together with Mathematics Specialist). For these combinations, scores cannot both be used. The best score in that subject is used.
  • If you have a scaled score in Language Other Than English, 10% of the LOTE scaled score is added to the aggregate of your best scaled scores. If you have more than one LOTE score, only one (the best) LOTE scaled score will be used as the LOTE bonus. You receive the LOTE bonus even if your LOTE course wasn’t one of your counted best four subjects.
  • If you have a scaled score in Mathematics Methods ATAR and/or Mathematics Specialist ATAR, 10% of your scaled score/s in these subjects will be added to your Tertiary Entrance Aggregate. You will receive this Mathematics bonus even if the course/s is not in your best four.
  • The maximum TEA is 430.

Your TEA will be calculated and then converted to an ATAR, which tells you where you are ranked relative to other students.

List A - WACE ATAR

Agribusiness
Business Management and Enterprise

The Business Management and Enterprise ATAR course gives students the opportunity to understand how vital business is to individuals and society, and how it impacts on many aspects of our lives. Business has a complex and dynamic organisational structure that requires a combination of skills, aptitude, creativity, initiative and enterprise to operate effectively. In a constantly changing world, individuals, businesses and nations must adapt their position in an increasingly global economy and generate the wealth to sustain economic growth. To do this, business requires people with strategic vision who are enterprising, innovative and creative. This course focuses on the development of these skills within the business cycle of day-to-day running and continuing viability and expansion of a business. Exposure to a wide range of business activities, management strategies and an understanding of enterprise, helps students to appreciate the significance of their role as both participants and consumers in the business world.

The Business Management and Enterprise ATAR course aims to prepare all students for a future where they will need to identify possibilities and create opportunities within a business environment. This course provides students with the ability to make sound and ethical business decisions based on critical thinking, in line with their own and societal values.

Business Management and Enterprise – Year 11 ATAR

The course equips students to proactively participate in the dynamic world of business, behave responsibly and demonstrate integrity in business activities.

Unit 1

The focus of this unit is on success in business at a national level. It explores what it takes to be successful beyond the initial start-up stage. Students investigate the features of successful marketing campaigns and report on how businesses succeed and prosper through methods, such as expansion in products, market share or diversification. The unit explores how the marketing plan contributes to the overall business plan.

Unit 2

The focus of this unit is on business growth and the challenges faced by businesses expanding at a national level. The unit explores issues in the business environment, including the importance of intellectual property in protecting business ideas. The unit addresses the significance of employee motivation and the development of a business plan in the overall success of expansion.

Business Management and Enterprise – Year 12 ATAR

Unit 3 

The focus of this unit is on strategic international business growth. The unit explores the need for global expansion and change management. It also addresses the opportunities provided by the global environment and the factors that drive international business development.

Unit 4 

The focus of this unit is on global business operations. The unit explores how businesses operate strategically and examines the features and traits of successful management. It addresses the significance of strategic planning and the concept of competitive advantage.

Chinese: First and Second Language

Chinese First Language ATAR Course Information

The Chinese: First Language ATAR course is designed for students with a cultural and linguistic background in Chinese. The course focuses on the interrelationship of language and culture, and further enhances the skills students possess to function in an increasingly globalised society and a culturally and linguistically diverse local community. Through engagement with the Chinese-speaking communities, locally and overseas, and through the study of contemporary texts, themes and issues, students strengthen their literacy skills in both the Chinese and English languages.

This course is organised into a Year 11 syllabus and a Year 12 syllabus. The cognitive complexity of the syllabus content increases from Year 11 to Year 12.

The Chinese: First Language ATAR course – Year 11 ATAR

Unit 1 Relationships and human interactions

This unit introduces students to text analysis and intercultural communication. It develops students’ ability to understand the communicative purpose of texts. Students engage with and produce texts related to the topics for this unit. They learn how to identify content, text structures and language features that convey information about the text producers’ intent and the target audiences. They recognise patterns of language use in texts that carry culture-specific meaning related to social relationships.

Unit 2 Communities in transition

This unit further develops students’ skills in text analysis and intercultural communication. It builds on students’ knowledge about the communicative purpose of texts to improve their awareness of how texts convey the attitudes and values of text producers. Through engaging with texts related to the topics for this unit, students analyse how texts are structured to show relationship of ideas, and how language that conveys cultural and emotional subtexts, such as euphemism, may affect the interpretation of a text.

The Chinese: First Language ATAR course – Year 12 ATAR

Unit 3 Adapting to different cultures

This unit consolidates the critical literacy skills that students have acquired to examine language features for sustaining text producers’ personal voices and for generating viewpoints, perspectives and values. Students engage with and produce texts related to the topics for this unit. They analyse texts to determine how language use reflects a text producer’s identity and biases. They evaluate the impact of language barriers on intercultural communication and exchange views on strategies for overcoming barriers in cross-cultural interactions.

Unit 4 Sustainability issues

This unit further extends the critical literacy skills that students have developed to evaluate communication strategies that text producers use to influence audiences and to shape attitudes. Students engage with and produce texts related to the topics for this unit. They analyse texts to determine how language use reflects a text producer’s social status. They reflect on language changes occurring across geographical locations and through time to determine the extent to which the same text can be interpreted differently by people from different cultures. They exchange views on ways of using this intercultural understanding to facilitate communication across cultures.

Chinese Second Language ATAR Course Information

This course progresses from the Year 7–10 curriculum and focuses on further developing a student’s knowledge and understanding of the culture and the language of Chinese-speaking communities. Students gain a broader and deeper understanding of the Chinese language and extend and refine their communication skills.

The Chinese: Second Language ATAR course can connect to the world of work, further study and travel. The Chinese: Second Language ATAR course is designed to equip students with the skills needed to function in an increasingly globalised society, a culturally and linguistically diverse local community, and to provide the foundation for life-long language learning.

This course is aimed at students for whom Chinese is a second, or subsequent, language. These students have not been exposed to, or interacted in the language outside of the language classroom. They have typically learnt everything they know about the Chinese language and culture through classroom teaching in an Australian school, or similar environment, where English is the language of school instruction. Students have typically studied Chinese for 200–400 hours at the commencement of Year 11, and may have experienced some short stays or exchanges in a country where the language is a medium of communication.

The Chinese language referred to in the Chinese: Second Language ATAR course is Modern Standard Chinese, also known as Mandarin. Simplified characters are used in writing.

This course is organised into a Year 11 syllabus (Unit 1 and 2) and a Year 12 syllabus (Unit 3 and 4). The cognitive complexity of the syllabus content increases from Year 11 to Year 12.  All unites are organised around three learning contexts and a set of three topics for each Unit.

Three contexts:

  • The Individual: Students explore aspects of their personal world, aspirations, values, opinions, ideas, and relationships with others. They also study topics from the perspectives of other people.
  • The Chinese-Speaking Communities: Students explore topics from the perspectives of individuals and groups within these communities, or the communities as a whole, and develop an understanding of how culture and identity are expressed through language.
  • The Changing World: Students explore information and communication technologies and the effects of the changes in the world and current issues in the global community.

Topics:

Unit 1:

  • Having fun- Students reflect on their favourite activities: sports, going out, and socialising.
  • Student’s daily life- Students explore the daily routines of young Chinese speakers: school, interests, and social activities.
  • Technology and leisure- Students consider the impact of technology on the lives of young people around the world.

Unit 2:

  • Tales of travel-Students reflect on their own travel experiences and plans and discuss what is essential when planning a travelling at home and/or abroad.
  • Western Australia as a travel destination-Students explore Western Australia as a destination for Chinese‐speaking travellers and discuss how they would prepare a Chinese speaker for a trip to Western Australia.
  • China as a travel destination-Students consider China as a tourist destination.

Unit 3:

  • Relationships-Students reflect on the different relationships in their lives.
  • Celebrations and traditions-Students explore major celebrations, traditions and festivals in Chinese communities.
  • Communicating in a modern worldStudents consider how the internet, mobiles, social networking and other technologies are used in building and maintaining relationships.

Unit 4:

  • Reflecting on my life and planning my futureStudents reflect on their final year at school and their plans for the future: further education, employment and travel.
  • The environmentStudents explore current issues in relation to the environment in Chinese-speaking communities.
  • Current issuesStudents consider issues in the changing world relevant to them.
Dance

Click here to access the subject information. 

Drama

Click here to access the subject information.

Economics

Economics investigates the choices which all people, groups and societies face as they attempt to resolve the ongoing problem of satisfying their unlimited wants with limited resources. Economics aims to understand and analyse the allocation, utilisation and distribution of scarce resources that determine our wealth and wellbeing. Economics develops the knowledge, reasoning and interpretation skills that form an important component of understanding individual, business and government behaviour at the local, national and global levels.

The Economics ATAR course encompasses the key features which characterise an economist’s approach to a recent economic event or issue: to simplify the essence of a problem; to collect economic information and data to assist analysis and reasoning; and to draw inferences, which assist decision-making, the development of public policy and improvement in economic wellbeing.

The Economics ATAR course develops reasoning, logical thinking and interpretation skills demanded by the world of work, business and government. These skills relate to a variety of qualifications in vocational, technical and university education contexts. The learning experiences available through studying this course explore the knowledge, values and opinions, which surround the complex range of economic events and issues facing our society, including market efficiency, market failure, gains from trade, the business cycle and economic policy.

Economic literacy developed through this course enables students to actively participate in economic and financial decision-making, which promotes individual and societal wealth and wellbeing.

Unit 1

Microeconomics is the study of particular markets, and segments of the economy. This unit explores the theory that markets are an efficient way to allocate scarce resources, using real-world markets with an emphasis on the Australian economy. When the forces of demand and supply do not allocate and price resources in a way that society would regard as efficient, equitable or sustainable, market failure can occur. Students examine examples of market failure along with a range of government policy options that can be applied to achieve more desirable outcomes. Students are also introduced to the language of economics and the use of theories and models to explain and interpret economic events and issues.

Unit 2

Macroeconomics is the study of the whole economy. This unit focuses on Australia’s macroeconomic performance using the circular flow of income model. The business cycle results in changes in the levels of output, income, spending and employment in the economy, which, in turn, have implications for economic growth, inflation and unemployment. Students also examine the role of the government in the macroeconomy.

Unit 3

This unit focuses on Australia’s links with the global economy. It analyses the gains from free trade and the effects of trade protection using relevant economic models. It includes topics on the balance of payments, the terms of trade and foreign investment. Students are required to use recent economic data to describe and explain trends in Australia’s economic transactions with the rest of the world. 

Unit 4

This unit focuses on understanding the business cycle using the aggregate expenditure model and the aggregate demand-aggregate supply model. Students examine recent macroeconomic data to analyse the performance of the economy. This unit also explores how economic policies, including fiscal policy, monetary policy and policies that promote productivity, operate in the pursuit of the Australian Government’s economic objectives. Students apply the language, theories and tools of economics to analyse the effectiveness of these policies.

English

Assessment Types

All assessments are in-class.

Every assessment type is done twice per year.

  • Comprehending – unseen texts and questions
  • Responding – essays on texts studied in class
  • Composing – narrative, interpretive andpersuasive writing on unseen topics/images
  • Oral presentations

Exams

Semester 1 and 2 exams are three (3) hours and have three (3) sections.

1. Comprehension – 3 short answer responses to 2unseen texts

2. Essay in response to a text studied in class; and

3. Composing – creative, interpretive or persuasive writing in response to an unseen prompt.

Texts

  • Short Stories
  • Novel x 1
  • Feature film x 2
  • Documentary x 1
  • Images
  • Non-fiction texts eg. articles, speeches, letters, blogs.

The texts are more complex and longer than General and more contemporary than Lit. Texts are read and assessments are prepared for at home.

Marks and Scaling

It is recommended students should have a final grade of at least 55% or above in Year 10 to select ATAR English.

Below approx 60% is considered a “danger zone” for ATAR English where students are at risk of being scaled down. Marks in the 50s risk falling below 50% as a final scaled mark.

English as an Additional Language or Dialect
French: Second Language

The French: Second Language ATAR course is designed to further develop students’ knowledge and understanding of the culture and the language of French-speaking communities, providing them with opportunities to gain a broader and deeper understanding of French and extend and refine their communication skills. The course focuses on the interrelationship of language and culture, and equips students with the skills needed to function in an increasingly globalised society, a culturally and linguistically diverse local community, and provides them with the foundation for life-long language learning. Relevant and engaging tasks, delivered through a range of appropriate contexts and topics, develop literacy in the French language as well as extend literacy development in English.

The Year 11 syllabus is divided into two units, each of one semester duration.

Unit 1

This unit focuses on C’est la vie ! (That’s life!) and is divided into three topics:

  • My daily routine: Students reflect on their daily routine at home and school and popular activities: sport and socialising in their lives and the lives of young French people.
  • French sports and leisure: Students consider popular traditional and modern sports and leisure activities enjoyed by French people.
  • Leading a healthy lifestyle: Students consider current issues in the global community that relate to healthy living, the importance of physical activity and maintaining a well-balanced lifestyle.

Unit 2

This unit focuses on Voyages (Travel) and is divided into three topics:

  • My travel tales and plans: Students reflect on their own travel tales and discuss what is essential when planning a trip and travelling at home and abroad.
  • Australia as a travel destination: Students explore Australia as a destination for
    French-speaking travellers, and discuss how they would prepare a French speaker for a trip to Australia.
  • Travel in a modern world: Students consider how technology is changing world travel, influencing the way people plan their holidays, and how they communicate with others while away.

The Year 12 syllabus is divided into two units, each of one semester duration.

Unit 3

This unit focuses on Les médias (The media) and is divided into three topics:

  • Technology and me: Students reflect on the role of technologies in their lives and in the lives of young people in French-speaking communities.
  • Film and music: Students develop an insight into the cultures and lifestyles of the French-speaking communities through examples of francophone films, film clips and music.
  • In the media: Students consider the media and its impact on the global community.

Unit 4

This unit focuses on Le monde qui nous entoure (The world around us) and is divided into three topics:

  • Planning my future: Students reflect on their plans for the future.
  • Migrant experiences: Students explore the accounts of French-speaking migrants to and from French-speaking communities, to consider reasons for migration, and experiences of participating in a new community.
  • Youth issues: Students consider global youth issues related to coping with pressures: stress, drugs and alcohol.
Geography

The study of geography draws on students’ curiosity about the diversity of the world’s places and their peoples, cultures and environments. It enables them to appreciate the complexity of our world and the diversity of its environments, economies and cultures and use this knowledge to promote a more sustainable way of life and awareness of social and spatial inequalities.

The Geography ATAR course provides a structured, disciplinary framework to investigate and analyse a range of challenges and associated opportunities facing Australia and the global community. These challenges include dealing with natural and ecological hazards, the impacts of globalisation, rapid change in physical environments and the sustainability of places.

Geography as a discipline values imagination, creativity and speculation as modes of thought. It provides a systematic, integrative way of exploring, analysing and applying the concepts of place, space, environment, interconnection, sustainability, scale and change. These principal geographical concepts are applied and explored in depth through unit topics to provide a deeper knowledge and understanding of the complex processes shaping our world. The ability of students to apply conceptual knowledge in the context of an inquiry, and the application of skills, constitutes ‘thinking geographically’ – a uniquely powerful way of viewing the world.

Unit 1

This unit focuses on understanding hazards, including the different types of hazards, the spatial distribution (where they occur), the causes (how they occur), the impacts and how to manage the risk of impacts from future hazard events. Risk management, in this particular context, refers to mitigation and preparedness. Mitigation is about reducing or eliminating the impact if the hazard does happen. Preparedness refers to actions carried out prior to the advance notice of a hazard to create and maintain the capacity of communities to respond to, and recover from, natural disasters. Preparedness starts at the local community level, but may extend to national and international levels through measures, such as planning, community education, information management, communications and warning systems.

Unit 2

This unit focuses on the process of globalisation and is based on the reality that we live in an increasingly interconnected world. It provides students with an understanding of the economic and cultural transformations taking place in the world today and the economic, environmental and social impacts of these changes. Cultural groups that may have been isolated in the early twentieth century are now linked across an interconnected world in which there is a ‘shrinking’ of time and space. This is a world in which advances in transport and telecommunications technologies have not only transformed global patterns of production and consumption but also facilitated the diffusion of ideas and elements of cultures.

Unit 3

This unit focuses on the changing biophysical cover of the Earth’s surface, the creation of anthropogenic biomes and the resulting impacts on either global climate or biodiversity. Land cover transformations have changed both global climate and biodiversity through their interaction with atmospheric and ecological systems. Conversely, climate change and loss of biodiversity are producing further land cover changes. Through applying the concept of sustainability, students are given the opportunity to examine and evaluate a program designed to address the negative effect of land cover change. Aspects of physical, environmental and human geography provide students with an integrated and comprehensive understanding of the processes related to land cover change, their local, regional and/or global environmental consequences, and possible sustainable solutions.

Unit 4

The unit begins with a global scale overview of the process of urbanisation and its consequences. Urbanisation not only affects the rate of world population growth, it has created a range of challenges for urban and rural places. The interconnected challenges faced in places, and other matters related to liveability, are a focus of this unit.

Two depth studies provide for a more focused and detailed way of teaching and learning. The first study focuses on challenges in metropolitan Perth or a regional urban centre in Western Australia. The second study focuses on challenges faced in a megacity. Students examine the concepts, processes and roles of planning in these selected contexts. This approach enables students to also develop an understanding of the challenges in two urban places.

Literature
Media Production & Analysis

With a focus on film, television and journalism studies, Media Production and Analysis students are given the opportunity to analyse and produce a range of media works. Working independently and in collaboration with others, students will become confident and competent in using media technologies to express their ideas.

UNITS 1 & 2: Media Production and Analysis – Year 11

Popular Film, Television and Journalism

Unit learning contexts may include a combination of the following:

  • Past and present television genres
  • Hollywood film
  • Australian and American journalism
  • Photojournalism
  • Documentary film

Students will have the opportunity to develop their understanding of production practices and responsibilities. This course has an examination component, can contribute to students’ ATAR scores, and can be followed up with units 3 and 4 in Year 12.

UNITS 3 & 4: Media Production and Analysis – Year 12 

Cinema Art Forms and Persuasive Journalism

Unit learning contexts may include a combination of the following:

  • Independent and experimental cinema
  • International and Australian cinema
  • Festival films
  • Documentary styles and traditions
  • Independent journalism and news sources

Students will focus on independent and experimental art cinema as well as persuasive journalism, developing their understanding of experimental aesthetic and narrative approaches. They will be given opportunities to extend their production skills and develop their personal style and are encouraged to experiment with filmmaking technologies and conventions to express their ideas. This course has an external examination and can contribute to students’ ATAR scores.

Types of Assessments

  • Production (50%)
  • Written (50%)

For more information regarding the syllabus, check the SCSA website.

 

Modern History

Modern history enhances students’ curiosity and imagination and their appreciation of larger themes, individuals, movements, events and ideas that have shaped the contemporary world. The themes that run through the units include: local, national and global conflicts and their resolution; the rise of nationalism and its consequences; the decline of imperialism and the process of decolonisation; the continuing struggle for the recognition of human rights; the transformation of social and economic life; the regional shifts in power and the rise of Asia; and the changing nature and influence of ideologies.

The Modern History ATAR course begins with a study of key developments that have helped to define the modern world, with special attention given to important ideas and their consequences. This provides a context for a study of movements for change in the 20th century that have challenged the authority of the nation-state, the principal form of political organisation in the modern world. Students then investigate crises that confronted nation-states in the 20th century, the responses to these crises and the different paths nations have taken in the modern world. The course concludes with a study of the distinctive features of world order that have emerged since World War II and that are central to an understanding of the present.

Unit 1

This unit examines developments of significance in the modern era, including the ideas that inspired them and their far-reaching consequences. Students examine one development or turning point that has helped to define the modern world. Students explore crucial changes, for example, the application of reason to human affairs; the transformation of production, capitalism and consumption, transport and communications; the challenge to social hierarchy and hereditary privilege, and the assertion of inalienable rights; and the new principles of government by consent.

Unit 2

This unit examines significant movements for change in the 20th century that led to change in society, including people’s attitudes and circumstances. These movements draw on the major ideas described in Unit 1, have been connected with democratic political systems, and have been subject to political debate. Through a detailed examination of one major 20th century movement, students investigate the ways in which individuals, groups and institutions have challenged existing political structures, accepted social organisation, and prevailing economic models, to transform societies.

Unit 3

This unit examines the characteristics of modern nations in the 20th century; the crises that confronted nations, their responses to these crises and the different paths nations have taken to fulfil their goals. Students study the characteristics of one nation. Students investigate crises that challenged the stability of government, the path of development that was taken and the social, economic and political order that was either established or maintained.

Unit 4

This unit examines some significant and distinctive features of the modern world within the period 1945–2001 in order to build students’ understanding of the contemporary world – that is, why we are here at this point in time. These include changes to the nature of the world order: shifting international tensions, alliances and power blocs; the emergence of Asia as a significant international political and economic force, and the nature of engagement by and with Australia; the nature of various conflicts and regional and international attempts to create peace and security.

Music

Music is a universal expression of human experience. It reflects the development of culture and identity in all societies throughout history. Music has an incredible capacity to inspire and elicit an emotional response through listening and performing and provides opportunities for creative and personal expression.

Through the practical study of Music, both individually and with others, students grow in confidence as musicians by engaging in opportunities to perform, compose, analyse and develop music literacy.

As empathetic, independent learners, students seek life-long engagement and enjoyment through the pursuit of music, be it personal, social, cultural and/or vocational.

The ATAR Music course is divided into a practical component and a written component, each worth 50%.

Practical component: Performance and/or Composition portfolio. Students can choose to perform on an instrument or voice and/or submit a composition portfolio. The majority of student study relating to the practical component occurs in instrumental/vocal lessons, practice and related activities. There are four defined styles in the Music course for the performance option, chosen by the individual student in consultation with their classroom teacher and/or instrumental/vocal teacher: Contemporary, Jazz, Music Theatre and Western Art Music. The focus of performance study and assessments is on repertoire from the chosen style.

Written component: In Music Literacy, students engage with a variety of activities to develop skills in aural and visual identification and analysis of the elements and characteristics of music, including playing, singing, listening, reading and writing various forms of notation. Through Composition, students creatively manipulate the elements of music as they compose their own music works and refine them through critical listening, singing, playing and gathering feedback from others. For the Music Analysis component, three designated works will be studied in each unit that are significant exemplars of the thematic organiser (Unit 1 – Elements, Unit 2 – Narratives). One designated work will be drawn from each of the Contemporary, Jazz and Western Art Music styles for each unit.

Music – Year 11

Prerequisites: It is desirable that students have studied Music during Year 8 to 10, or have an equivalent music theory and performance accreditation.

Unit 1

Students engage in music making as performers and/or composers, both individually and collaboratively. They develop their music literacy, learning how the elements and characteristics of music can be applied, combined and manipulated when, performing, composing, listening to and analysing music. The music analysis theme for this unit is Elements. The designated works are West End Blues (Louis Armstrong), Will You Love Me Tomorrow (The Shyrelles) and Trumpet Concerto in Eb Mvt. 3 (Joseph Haydn).

Unit 2

Students confidently engage in music making as performers and/or composers, both individually and collaboratively. They continue to develop and consolidate their music literacy, learning how the elements and characteristics of music can be applied, combined and manipulated when performing, composing, listening to and analysing music. The music analysis theme for this unit is Narratives. How can music tell a story? The designated works are A Day In The Life (The Beatles), Take The A Train (Ella Fitzgerald and Duke Ellington) and Die Moldau (Bedrich Smetana).

Music – Year 12

Prerequisites: It is desirable that students have studied Music during Year 8 to 10 and successfully completed Year 11 Music, or have an equivalent music achievement level.

Unit 3

Students continue to engage in music making as performers and/or composers, both individually and collaboratively. They continue to develop and consolidate their music literacy, learning how the elements and characteristics of music can be applied, combined and manipulated when performing, composing, listening to and analysing music. The music analysis theme for this unit is Identities. What can music tell us about people? The designated works are Marryuna (Baker Boy), Strange Fruit (Billie Holiday) and Gaelic Symphony Mvt. 1 (Amy Beach).

Unit 4

Students confidently engage in music making as performers and/or composers, both individually and collaboratively. They continue to develop and consolidate their music literacy, learning how the elements and characteristics of music can be applied, combined and manipulated when performing, composing, listening to and analysing music. The music analysis theme for this unit is Innovations. What drives a composer to create something truly different? The designated works are Bohemian Rhapsody (Queen), Tha Thin Tha (Lisa Young) and Short Ride In A Fast Machine (John Adams).

Politics & Law

The Politics and Law ATAR course aims to develop knowledge and understanding of the principles, structures, institutions, processes, and practices of political and legal systems, primarily in Australia and where appropriate, other systems and/or countries. The course challenges students to critically examine the effectiveness of political and legal systems using criteria, such as openness, responsiveness and accountability of those systems. The course provides for both a chronological and contemporary understanding of political and legal issues in society.
The skills and values developed in the Politics and Law ATAR course aim to allow students to become informed, active and effective participants in the political and legal decisions that affect their lives within society.
The study of the Politics and Law ATAR course contributes to students’ intellectual, social, and ethical development. The course aims to support all students in developing a sense of identity, and a sense of political, legal, cultural and social awareness.

Unit 1

This unit examines the principles of a liberal democracy; the legislative, executive and judicial structures and processes of Australia’s political and legal system; the functioning of a non-democratic system; and the processes of a non-common law system.
Political and legal developments and contemporary issues (the last three years) are used to provide a framework for the unit.

Unit 2

This unit examines the principles of fair elections; the electoral and voting systems in Australia since Federation, making reference to a recent (the last ten years) election in Australia; the electoral system of another country; an analysis of the civil and criminal law processes in Western Australia; and an analysis of a non-common law system.
Political and legal developments and contemporary issues (the last three years) are used to provide a framework for the unit.

Unit 3

This unit examines various aspects of the political and legal system established by the Commonwealth Constitution (Australia), including the roles and powers of the legislative, executive and judicial branches of government, with a comparison to a non-Westminster system; the influence of individuals, political parties and pressure groups on the law making process of parliament and the courts; and the operation of federalism and the balance of power between the Commonwealth and the States in Australia.
Political and legal developments and contemporary issues (the last three years) are used to provide a framework for the unit.

Unit 4

This unit examines the structures, processes and procedures of accountability in relation to the legislative, executive and judicial branches of government in Australia; how rights are protected, and democratic principles can be upheld and/or undermined, in Australia and one other country; and the experience of a particular group with respect to their political and legal rights in Australia.
Political and legal developments and contemporary issues (the last three years) are used to provide a framework for the unit.

Visual Art

Year 11

Assessment Types

  • Production Practical 50%
  • Analysis 15%
  • Investigation 15%
  • Exam 20%

Unit 1 – Differences

Unit description

The focus for this unit is differences. Students may, for example, consider differences arising from cultural diversity, place, gender, class and historical period. Differences relating to art forms, media and conventions may also provide a stimulus for exploration and expression.

Students explore ways of collecting, compiling and recording information and documenting thinking and working practices. They explore approaches to drawing and develop awareness that each artist has his or her particular way of making marks to convey personal vision. Students examine how visual language and media choices contribute to the process of conveying function and meaning, and use a range of media and technologies to explore, create, and communicate ideas.

Students recognise that visual artwork is subject to different interpretations and appreciate that informed responses should take into account the varying contexts within which a work of art is created. They develop awareness of styles of representation, examining distinctly individualistic approaches of artists in different times and places.

Unit 2 – Identities

Unit description

The focus for this unit is identities. In working with this focus, students explore concepts or issues related to personal, social, cultural or gender identity. They become aware that self-expression distinguishes individuals as well as cultures. Students use a variety of stimulus materials and use a range of investigative approaches as starting points to create artwork. They develop a personal approach to the development of ideas and concepts, making informed choices about the materials, skills, techniques and processes used to resolve and present their artwork.

Students develop understandings of the personal and/or public functions of art in the expression of identity, for example, spiritual expression, psychological expression, therapy, ceremony and ritual, and the purposes of art, such as narrative – telling personal stories or exploring myths. They understand that art may give form to ideas and issues that concern the wider community.

Response to artwork stimulates insights, encourages deeper understandings, and challenges preconceived ideas. Students develop an awareness of how the visual arts may be both socially confirming and questioning, analyse their own cultural beliefs and values and develop deeper understandings of their own personal visual arts heritage.

Year 12

Assessment Types

  • Production Practical 50%

Body of Work

Resolved Artwork

  • Written 50%
    • Analysis
    • Investigation
    • Exam

Unit 3 – Commentaries

Unit description

The focus for this unit is commentaries. In this unit, students engage with the social and cultural purposes of art making to produce a unique and cohesive body of work. Broad and innovative inquiry includes the conceptualisation and documentation of experiences within contemporary society. Students transform ideas and develop concepts using innovative approaches to art making and presentation. They document their thinking and working practices, having the flexibility to work across media and art forms.

Students research artwork providing critical comment on the meaning, purpose and values communicated. They examine their own beliefs and consider how the visual arts have reflected and shaped society in different times and places.

Consideration is given to the roles of artists in different societies, for example, hero, outsider, commentator and social critic. Students investigate the social functions of art, for example political and ideological expression, satire, social description or graphic communication. They address the relationship between form, function and meaning and develop understandings of how artists are influenced by pervasive ideas, events and circumstances, and how re-contextualisation contributes to meanings and messages in artwork.

Unit 4 – Points of view

Unit description

The focus of this unit is points of view. Students identify and explore concepts or issues of personal significance in the presentation of a sustained, articulate, and authentic body of work. They engage in sustained inquiry, exploring ideas and developing concepts to communicate a personal point of view.

Students investigate a range of solutions using visual language and document the progressive resolution of thinking and working practices. Skills, techniques, and processes are combined in the pursuit of new art forms, innovation, and personal style.

Students use critical analysis frameworks to develop an understanding of the practice of art making and art interpretation. They research and analyse factors affecting points of view such as time, place, culture, religion and politics, synthesising this knowledge to express a personal viewpoint or position. In the analysis of their own and others’ artwork, students reflect on the relationship between artwork, audiences and contextual factors, and consider how these contribute to the development of different perspectives.

List B - WACE ATAR

Accounting & Finance

The Accounting and Finance ATAR course aims to make students financially literate by creating an understanding of the systems and processes through which financial practices and decision making are carried out, as well as the ethical, social and environmental issues involved. It helps students to analyse and make informed decisions about finances.

Financial literacy gives individuals the ability to make sound financial judgements. In an age when many business practices and ethical standards are being questioned, awareness of the ways financial practices impact on their lives helps students take responsibility for their own financial commitments. It gives them the problem-solving skills to operate at many levels of financial decision making.

Through engagement with the course, students develop an understanding of the fundamentals on which accounting and financial management are based. Many students will find themselves self-employed and there is a high probability that they will have to engage in some form of accounting practices. Having an understanding of these practices enables them to analyse their own financial data and make informed decisions based on that analysis.

In a rapidly changing world, the impact of technology on financial and accounting practices has been vast. The use of computer systems for record keeping, and the communication of financial data is already vital, and will continue to shape future careers. Many of these careers have not yet evolved, but when they do, they will involve technology and financial practices at some level.

Accounting and Finance – Year 11 

Unit 1

The focus for this unit is on double entry accounting for small businesses. Students apply their understanding of financial principles, systems and institutions to manage financial information and make decisions in a variety of small businesses. Students develop an understanding of the rationale for the use of particular conventions and principles and the consequences of disregarding them. Students record and process financial information using the double entry system and apply the principles of the Goods and Services Tax (GST). Students learn about the various forms of business organisations adopted by small business.

Unit 2

The focus for this unit is on accrual accounting. Students apply financial systems and principles to the operations of businesses and distinguish between cash and accrual methods of accounting. Students prepare and analyse financial reports for a variety of types of business organisations and become familiar with the main aspects of electronic processing of financial data. Students learn of the role and functions of the professional accounting and financial associations.

Accounting and Finance – Year 12 

Unit 3

The focus for this unit is on internal management for business. Students prepare and interpret budgets and performance reports in relation to forecasting a business’s future. The unit distinguishes between internal and external reporting requirements. Decision-making processes using cost accounting techniques are a feature of the unit. The unit focuses on critical analysis of financial information. The unit also explores the importance of short and long term planning for business.

Unit 4

The focus for this unit is on Australian reporting entities and how they are regulated by the Corporations Act 2001. The Framework for the Preparation and Presentation of General Purpose Financial Reports (The Framework) and the Accounting Standards are used in the preparation of the financial statements for a reporting entity. The financing options of larger entities are identified and evaluated, particularly in relation to conformity with basic principles, including profitability and stability. The unit addresses corporate social disclosure issues and ethical behaviour within corporations.

Applied Information Technology

The Applied Information Technology ATAR course provides students with the opportunity to develop the knowledge and skills of technologies. Working independently and collaborating with others, students will investigate issues and challenges to develop solutions. It also encourages students to use technologies in a responsible, secure, and informed manner.

Units 1 & 2 – Year 11

Unit 1 Media Information and Communication Technologies

This unit focuses on the use of digital technologies to create and manipulate digital media.

Unit 2 Digital Technologies in Business

 

This unit focuses on the skills, principles and practices associated with various types of documents and communications.

 

Types of assessments:

  • Projects 40%
  • Short Answer 15%
  • Extended Answer 15%
  • Examination 30%

Students will have the opportunity to develop their understanding of production practices and responsibilities. This course has an examination component, can contribute to students’ ATAR scores, and can be followed up with units 3 and 4 in Year 12.

Units 3 & 4 – Year 12

Unit 3 Evolving Digital Technologies

This unit focuses on the use of applications to create, modify, manipulate, use and/or manage technologies. This includes using online software, and video, sound and publishing applications. 

Unit 4 Digital Technologies Within a Global Society

This unit focuses on the production of a digital solution for a particular client. Some aspects include the security of data and networks, cloud computing, and the sharing of data in today’s world.

Types of assessments:

  • Projects 40%
  • Short Answer 10%
  • Extended Answer 10%
  • Examination 40%

This course has an external examination and can contribute to students’ ATAR scores.

For more information regarding the syllabus, check the SCSA website.

Biology

Purpose of Course

As one of the three natural sciences in the IB Diploma Programme, chemistry is primarily concerned with identifying patterns that allow us to explain matter at the microscopic level. This then allows us to predict and control matter’s behaviour at a macroscopic level. The subject therefore emphasizes the development of representative models and explanatory theories, both of which rely heavily on creative but rational thinking. Given the pattern-seeking nature of chemistry, the development of generalized rules and principles also plays an important part in knowledge production, as do the concrete statements provided by mathematical laws.

With its roots in the practice of alchemy, chemistry maintains a strong emphasis on empirical experimentation. However, with advances in technology, it now extends its reach beyond the limits of the human senses at a macroscopic level and into fields such as spectroscopy and computer molecular modelling. Insights from these technologies often require thorough mathematical analysis before being accepted as valid justifications for scientific claims. In all their investigative work, chemists must qualify confidence in their discoveries by considering potential errors related to methodology or limitations in measuring equipment.

Core Concepts

Both HL and SL students integrate concepts, topic content and the nature of science through inquiry.  The course is organised into two conceptual themes: Structure – which refers to the nature of matter from simple to more complex forms and Reactivity – which refers to how and why chemical reactions occur.

Higher Level extension

Students at SL and HL share the following.

  • An understanding of science through a stimulating experimental programme
  • The nature of science as an overarching theme
  • The study of a concept-based syllabus
  • One piece of internally assessed work, the scientific investigation
  • The collaborative sciences project

The SL course provides students with a fundamental understanding of chemistry and experience of the associated skills. The HL course requires students to increase their knowledge and understanding of the subject, including additional mathematical skills, and so provides a solid foundation for further study at university level.

Assessment

All students undertake a collaborative sciences project, an interdisciplinary sciences project that addresses real world problems that can be explored through the sciences. All students then complete two summative assessments, their internal assessment and external examinations.

The Internal assessment is an integral part of the course and is compulsory for both SL and HL students. It enables students to demonstrate the application of their skills and knowledge, and to pursue their personal interests, without the time limitations and other constraints that are associated with written examinations. This will make up 20% of the final IB mark.

The external assessment will consist of two exams which will assess their understanding of the material covered in the course as well as their ability to analyse and evaluate experimental data. The two exams will make up the remaining 80% of the final mark.

Prerequisites

Students intending on proceeding with Standard Level Chemistry should be working towards obtaining a minimum of 60% average in Year 10 Chemistry. Students intending on proceeding with Higher Level Chemistry should be working towards obtaining a minimum average of 65% in Year 10 Chemistry. Students should also be competent in Science Investigation Skills.

Chemistry
Design

Design involves the development, planning, and production of ideas, which can be communicated to an audience or client. In this course, students are presented with issues or problems that affect the world around them and are challenged to apply Design Thinking strategies to generate ideas for innovative solutions.

The ideas that students can explore are limitless! This is a course for creative individuals who seek to broaden their minds and test their ways of thinking.

Students will learn a range of Design theories and practices, as well as a range of principles, methods and techniques that are drawn from a variety of different disciplines, such as photography, digital design, technical graphics, art and architecture.

Design – Year 11

Unit 1 – Representational Design

In this unit, students begin to learn and apply techniques that allow them to effectively communicate their design ideas to others.

They enter their first foray into the Double Diamond design framework, which allows them to take an identified problem and, through a cyclical process of prototyping, testing, and refining, develop a range of ideas to produce an innovative design solution. This framework provides students with significant creative freedom to generate their own unique design brief and solution.

They are introduced to a range of design tools as well as design principles and elements to create engaging representations of their designs.

Unit 2 – User-Centred Design

This unit focuses on the generation of designs to meet the needs of a specific end-user. Students are required to prototype and adjust their designs in response to user feedback, ensuring that their ideas provide practical solutions to solve a problem.

Year 11 – Design Assessments
Production Portfolio 50%
Response 30%
Examination 20%

Design – Year 12

Unit 3 – Commercial Design

Students become aware that commercial design is client and market-driven and is a reflection of contemporary consumer demands. Students are introduced to a client‐focused design brief to produce a product or service. They also consider design requirements for a real-world solution, through using relevant production skills and processes, materials, and technologies.

Unit 4 – Influential Design

The focus of this unit is the way in which design can communicate ideas, messages, information, and values, to influence opinions and attitudes. Students produce products and visual layouts for specific and applied contexts with an understanding of applied semiotics and the construction of meaning.

Year 12 – Design Assessments
Production Portfolio 50%
Response 20%
Examination 30%

For more information see the SCSA website.

Engineering Studies (Mechatronics)
Food Science & Technology

Year 11

Structure of the Syllabus

The Year 11 syllabus is divided into two units, each of one semester duration, which are typically delivered as a pair.

Unit 1 – Food science

In this unit, students explore how sensory, physical and chemical properties influence the selection, use and consumption of raw and processed foods. Using scientific methods, they examine the functional properties, which determine the performance of food. Students explore societal and economic issues and lifestyles that influence food choices.

Students examine primary and secondary food processes that affect nutrition, food quality and supply. They research the effect of under-consumption and over-consumption of nutrients on health and investigate a range of diet-related health conditions that affect individuals and families.

Students develop their expertise with technology and communication skills to implement strategies to design food products, services or processing systems. They select resources to meet performance requirements and use evaluation strategies to monitor and maintain optimum standards. Students follow occupational safety and health requirements and safe food handling practices. They use a variety of foods and processes to produce and evaluate food products, services or systems.

Unit 2 – The undercover story

This unit focuses on food spoilage and contamination and explores reasons for preserving food. Students investigate food processing techniques and preservation principles. They consider the laws and regulations that determine the way food is safely preserved, packaged, labelled and stored.

Students learn how the principles of the Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) system are implemented to produce and provide safe food. They investigate the food supply chain, natural and processed functional foods and value-adding techniques that are applied to food to meet producer and consumer requirements. Students examine cultural traditions, beliefs and values, location, economic and media influences on the nutritional wellbeing of individuals that arise from lifestyle and food choices.

Students apply their knowledge of the technology process to meet design specifications, including legal requirements and devise food orders, production plans, and produce safe, palatable, quality food. Students implement the principles of dietary planning, use food models, and adapt recipes and processing techniques when considering specific nutritional needs of demographic groups.

Year 12 

Structure of the syllabus

The Year 12 syllabus is divided into two units which are delivered as a pair.

Unit 3 – Food diversity and equity

This unit focuses on the relationships between food science and technology, food consumption patterns and issues of food diversity and equity in Australian society. Students investigate biotechnology and the process of genetic modification and determine the benefits and risks involved. They analyse factors that influence food selection, including advertising and marketing practices. Influences on the development and production of functional foods, food products, services and systems are examined.

Students investigate the principles of the Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) system to manage food safety, and the associated laws and regulatory codes to ensure food for sale is safe and suitable for human consumption. Using the technology process, students trial and adapt recipes and processing techniques to devise and produce food products that demonstrate functional properties of food. Students evaluate and analyse processes and results, justifying choices and drawing conclusions. They make recommendations to adjust and improve processing techniques.

Unit 4 – The future of food

In this unit, students explore how food production systems can provide a sustainable supply of food for current and future world populations. They examine technologies that create innovative food products and investigate influences on global food supply, unequal distribution of food resources and consequences of global food inequity. Influence of food innovation in the development of food products and the impact of food availability, selection, consumption and the nutritional value of food for specific demographic groups are investigated.

Students examine the role and responsibility of organisations that control foods imported into Australia and the advertising and marketing laws related to food and beverages. Using the technology process, students collect, interpret and analyse data to examine practices used to develop new food products. They trial and adapt recipes and processing techniques to develop a food product. Students evaluate, analyse, draw conclusions and make recommendations when assessing the features and suitability of new food products.

Human Biological Science

Human Biology covers a wide range of ideas relating to the functioning human. Students learn about themselves, relating structure to function and how integrated regulation allows individuals to survive in a changing environment. They research new discoveries that are increasing our understanding of the causes of dysfunction, which can lead to new treatments and preventative measures. Reproduction is studied to understand the sources of variation that make each of us unique individuals. Through a combination of classical genetics, and advances in molecular genetics, dynamic new biotechnological processes have resulted. Population genetics is studied to highlight the longer term changes leading to natural selection and evolution of our species.

As a science, the subject matter of this course is founded on knowledge and understanding that has been gained through systematic inquiry and scientific research. However, this knowledge is far from complete and is being modified and expanded as new discoveries and advancements are made. Students develop their understanding of the cumulative and evolving nature of scientific knowledge and the ways in which such knowledge is obtained through scientific investigations. They learn to think critically, to evaluate evidence, to solve problems and to communicate understandings in scientific ways.

An understanding of human biology is valuable for a variety of career paths. The course content deals directly and indirectly with many different occupations in fields, such as science education, medical and paramedical fields, food and hospitality, childcare, sport and social work. Appreciation of the range and scope of such professions broadens their horizons and enables them to make informed choices. This helps to prepare all students, regardless of their background or career aspirations, to take their place as responsible citizens in society.

Unit 1 – The functioning human body

In this unit, students analyse how the structure and function of body systems, and the interrelationships between systems, support metabolism and body functioning.

Unit 2 – Reproduction and inheritance

In this unit, students study the reproductive systems of males and females, the mechanisms of transmission of genetic material from generation to generation, and the effects of the environment on gene expression.

Unit 3 – Homeostasis and disease

This unit explores the nervous and endocrine systems and the mechanisms that help maintain the systems of the body to function within normal range, and the body’s immune responses to invading pathogens.

Unit 4 – Human variation and evolution

This unit explores the variations in humans, their changing environment and evolutionary trends in hominids.

 

 

Marine & Maritime Studies

A significant relationship between the marine environment and humans has existed throughout history. Australia is an island nation, with Western Australia’s mainland and islands having approximately twenty-one thousand kilometres of coastline. It is therefore relevant to Western Australians to study the sea and how people interact with it. The Marine and Maritime Studies ATAR course provides students with the opportunity to understand and explore this relationship and the importance of developing and maintaining a sustainable future for our coastal and marine environments.

Students are given the opportunity to develop responsible and competent boat-handling and navigation skills under power, and in doing so, demonstrate an understanding of nautical concepts. They develop knowledge of the properties inherent in seaworthy craft and the basics of good boat design, construction and maintenance. Students will also be provided with the opportunity to develop personal water-based skills (swimming/snorkelling/scuba), to allow them to engage directly with the marine environment.

Students investigate oceanography concepts to develop a strong understanding of the interdependence between elements of the marine environment, conduct research into the safe and sustainable management of the oceans’ resources for conservation and commercialism, and are also introduced to the world of maritime archaeology.

Unit 1

This unit explores types of Western Australian marine ecosystems, marine resources, nautical craft design features, power boating, historic sea routes and mapping of the Western Australian coastline.

Unit 2

This unit explores the cycling of matter through marine ecosystems and global ocean currents. Historical and archaeological understandings and the skills associated with power boating are further developed. Students investigate management of local Western Australian fisheries.

Unit 3

This unit explores Western Australian ocean currents and factors which influence the productivity of marine ecosystems, major issues affecting Australia’s marine environment, shipwrecks and snorkelling and diving.

Unit 4

This unit focuses on the impacts of climate change, coastal erosion and strategies for managing marine biodiversity. Western Australian historical and archaeological understandings and the skills associated with snorkelling and diving are further developed.

Materials Design & Technologies (Textiles)

Year 11

Assessment Types

  • Design Practical Portfolio 25%
  • Production Practical 50%
  • Response Written 25%

Unit 1 (Semester 1 Fashion Garment- varies according to current trends)

Students develop an understanding of the elements and fundamentals of design and consider human factors involved in the design, production and use of their projects. They develop creative thinking strategies and work on design projects within specified constraints. Students learn about the classification, structure and properties of a variety of materials, making appropriate materials selection for design needs.

Students learn about manufacturing and production skills and techniques. They develop the skills and techniques appropriate to the materials being used and gain practice in planning and managing processes through the production of design project.

Unit 2 (Semester 2 Fashion Garment- varies according to current trends)

Students learn about the nature of designing for a client. Students apply an understanding of the elements and fundamentals of design and consider human factors involved in their design project. Students learn about the nature, properties and environmental impacts and issues related to a variety of materials and production techniques. They develop creative thinking strategies, and work on design projects as well as consider the environmental impacts and issues related to the sustainability and recycling of materials.

Students extend their understanding of safe working practices and contemporary manufacturing techniques, and develop the knowledge, understanding and skills required to manage the processes of designing and manufacturing.

Year 12

Unit 3 and Unit 4

Note: this course runs concurrently and the end result is a culmination of a design portfolio and major design project. The course is broken down into the following assessment types that include written exams.

Assessment Types

  • Design Practical 50%
  • Design Written 50%
  • Note: The Design Portfolio makes up 50% of the examination mark and is moderated by SCSA

Course Description

Students investigate and analyse cultural and social factors which may have influenced historical and contemporary design. They extend their understanding of design aesthetics through the application of the elements and principles of design and the use of creative and critical thinking strategies. Students work with an open and self-directed design brief to manage a project to design products to meet needs.

They incorporate a wide range of design concepts and apply conceptualisation skills and production processes to realising design ideas that reflect their personal influences in combination with the style and tastes of a client.

They examine critically current products and explore how emerging materials and technologies may affect, and be incorporated into, the design and development of future products.

Students investigate a range of materials, relating material characteristics and properties, and methods of processing and finishing, appropriate to their application and use.

Students identify and manage risks, and select and use appropriate methods for communicating ideas and design development. Students develop competence with production processes and learn to manage projects to determined design specifications.

Materials Design & Technologies (Woodwork)

Year 11

Assessment Types

  • Design Practical Portfolio 25%
  • Production Practical 50%
  • Response Written 25%

Unit 1 (Semester 1 Hall Table)

Students develop an understanding of the elements and fundamentals of design and consider human factors involved in the design, production and use of their projects. They develop creative thinking strategies and work on design projects within specified constraints. Students learn about the classification, structure and properties of a variety of materials, making appropriate materials selection for design needs.

Students learn about manufacturing and production skills and techniques. They develop the skills and techniques appropriate to the materials being used and gain practice in planning and managing processes through the production of design project.

Unit 2 (Semester 2 Hallway Mirror)

Students learn about the nature of designing for a client. Students apply an understanding of the elements and fundamentals of design and consider human factors involved in their design project. Students learn about the nature, properties and environmental impacts and issues related to a variety of materials and production techniques. They develop creative thinking strategies, and work on design projects as well as consider the environmental impacts and issues related to the sustainability and recycling of materials.

Students extend their understanding of safe working practices and contemporary manufacturing techniques, and develop the knowledge, understanding and skills required to manage the processes of designing and manufacturing.

Year 12

Unit 3 and Unit 4

Note: this course runs concurrently and the end result is a culmination of a design portfolio and major design project. The course is broken down into the following assessment types that include written exams.

Assessment Types

  • Design Practical 50%
  • Design Written 50%

Note: The Design Portfolio makes up 50% of the mark and is moderated by SCSA

Course Description

Students investigate and analyse cultural and social factors which may have influenced historical and contemporary design. They extend their understanding of design aesthetics through the application of the elements and principles of design and the use of creative and critical thinking strategies. Students work with an open and self-directed design brief to manage a project to design products to meet needs.

They incorporate a wide range of design concepts and apply conceptualisation skills and production processes to realising design ideas that reflect their personal influences in combination with the style and tastes of a client.

They examine critically current products and explore how emerging materials and technologies may affect, and be incorporated into, the design and development of future products.

Students investigate a range of materials, relating material characteristics and properties, and methods of processing and finishing, appropriate to their application and use.

Students identify and manage risks, and select and use appropriate methods for communicating ideas and design development. Students develop competence with production processes and learn to manage projects to determined design specifications.

 

 

Mathematics Applications

This course focuses on the use of mathematics to solve problems in contexts that involve financial modelling, geometric and trigonometric analysis, graphical and network analysis, and growth and decay in sequences. It also provides opportunities for students to develop systematic strategies based on the statistical investigation process for answering statistical questions that involve analysing univariate and bivariate data, including time series data. The Mathematics Applications ATAR course is designed for students who want to extend their mathematical skills beyond Year 10 level, but whose future studies or employment pathways do not require knowledge of calculus. The course is designed for students who have a wide range of educational and employment aspirations, including continuing their studies at university or TAFE.

Unit 1

This unit has three topics: ‘Consumer arithmetic’, ‘Algebra and matrices’, and ‘Shape and measurement’. ‘Consumer arithmetic’ reviews the concepts of rate and percentage change in the context of earning and managing money and provides a fertile ground for the use of spread sheets. ‘Algebra and matrices’ continues the Year 7–10 curriculum study of algebra and introduces the topic of matrices. The emphasis of this topic is the symbolic representation and manipulation of information from real-life contexts using algebra and matrices. ‘Shape and measurement’ builds on and extends the knowledge and skills students developed in the Year 7–10 curriculum with the concept of similarity and associated calculations involving simple geometric shapes. The emphasis in this topic is on applying these skills in a range of practical contexts, including those involving three-dimensional shapes.

Unit 2

This unit has three topics: ‘Univariate data analysis and the statistical process’, ‘Linear equations and their graphs’, and ‘Applications of trigonometry’. ‘Univariate data analysis and the statistical process’ develops students’ ability to organise and summarise univariate data in the context of conducting a statistical investigation. ‘Linear equations and their graphs’ uses linear equations and straight-line graphs, as well as linear-piece-wise and step graphs to model and analyse practical situations. ‘Applications of trigonometry’ extends students’ knowledge of trigonometry to solve practical problems involving non-right- angled triangles in both two and three dimensions, including problems involving the use of angles of elevation and depression and bearings in navigation.

Unit 3

This unit has three topics: ‘Bivariate data analysis’, ‘Growth and decay in sequences’, and ‘Graphs and networks’. ‘Bivariate data analysis’ introduces students to some methods for identifying, analysing and describing associations between pairs of variables, including the use of the least-squares method as a tool for modelling and analysing linear associations. ‘Growth and decay in sequences’ employs recursion to generate sequences that can be used to model and investigate patterns of growth and decay in discrete situations. These sequences find application in a wide range of practical situations, including modelling the growth of a compound interest investment, the growth of a bacterial population, or the decrease in the value of a car over time. ‘Graphs and networks’ introduces students to the language of graphs and the ways in which graphs, represented as a collection of points and interconnecting lines, can be used to model and analyse everyday situations, such as a rail or social network.

Unit 4

This unit has three topics: ‘Time series analysis’, ‘Loans, investments and annuities’, and ‘Networks and decision mathematics’. ‘Time series analysis’ continues students’ study of statistics by introducing them to the concepts and techniques of time series analysis. The content is to be taught within the framework of the statistical investigation process. ‘Loans investments and annuities’ aims to provide students with sufficient knowledge of financial mathematics to solve practical problems associated with taking out or refinancing a mortgage and making investments. ‘Networks and decision mathematics’ uses networks to model and aid decision making in practical situations.

Mathematics Methods

This course focuses on the use of calculus and statistical analysis. The study of calculus provides a basis for understanding rates of change in the physical world, and includes the use of functions, their derivatives and integrals, in modelling physical processes. The study of statistics develops students’ ability to describe and analyse phenomena that involve uncertainty and variation. Mathematics Methods provides a foundation for further studies in disciplines in which mathematics and statistics have important roles. It is also advantageous for further studies in the health and social sciences. In summary, this course is designed for students whose future pathways may involve mathematics and statistics and their applications in a range of disciplines at the tertiary level.

Unit 1

The study of inferential statistics begins in this unit with a review of the fundamentals of probability and the introduction of the concepts of counting, conditional probability, and independence. The unit covers a review of the basic algebraic concepts and techniques required for a successful introduction to the study of calculus. The basic trigonometric functions are then introduced. Simple relationships between variable quantities are reviewed, and these are used to introduce the key concepts of a function and its graph. Access to technology to support the computational and graphical aspects of these topics is assumed.

Unit 2

The algebra section of this unit focuses on exponentials. Their graphs are examined and their applications in a wide range of settings are explored. Arithmetic and geometric sequences are introduced and their applications are studied. Rates and average rates of change are introduced, and this is followed by the key concept of the derivative as an ‘instantaneous rate of change’. These concepts are reinforced numerically, by calculating difference quotients both geometrically as slopes of chords and tangents, and algebraically. Calculus is developed to study the derivatives of polynomial functions, with simple application of the derivative to curve sketching, the calculation of slopes and equations of tangents, the determination of instantaneous velocities and the solution of optimisation problems. The unit concludes with a brief consideration of anti-differentiation.

Unit 3

The study of calculus continues with the derivatives of exponential and trigonometric functions and their applications, together with some differentiation techniques and applications to optimisation problems and graph sketching. It concludes with integration, both as a process that reverses differentiation and as a way of calculating areas. The fundamental theorem of calculus as a link between differentiation and integration is emphasised. In statistics, discrete random variables are introduced, together with their uses in modelling random processes involving chance and variation. This supports the development of a framework for statistical inference.

Unit 4

The calculus in this unit deals with derivatives of logarithmic functions. In probability and statistics, continuous random variables and their applications are introduced, and the normal distribution is used in a variety of contexts. The study of statistical inference in this unit is the culmination of earlier work on probability and random variables. Statistical inference is one of the most important parts of statistics, in which the goal is to estimate an unknown parameter associated with a population using a sample of data drawn from that population. In the Mathematics Methods ATAR course, statistical inference is restricted to estimating proportions in two-outcome populations.

Mathematics Specialist

This course provides opportunities, beyond those presented in the Mathematics Methods ATAR course, to develop rigorous mathematical arguments and proofs, and to use mathematical models more extensively. Mathematics Specialist contains topics in functions and calculus that build on and deepen the ideas presented in the Mathematics Methods course, as well as demonstrate their application in many areas. The Mathematics Specialist course also extends understanding and knowledge of statistics and introduces the topics of vectors, complex numbers, and matrices. Mathematics Specialist is the only ATAR mathematics course that should not be taken as a stand-alone course and it is recommended to be studied in conjunction with the Mathematics Methods ATAR course as preparation for entry to specialised university courses such as engineering, physical sciences, and mathematics.

 

Unit 1

The three topics in Unit 1 complement the content of the Mathematics Methods ATAR course. The proficiency strand of Reasoning, from the Year 7–10 curriculum, is continued explicitly in the topic Geometry through a discussion of developing mathematical arguments. This topic also provides the opportunity to summarise and extend students’ studies in Euclidean Geometry, knowledge which is of great benefit in the later study of topics such as vectors and complex numbers. The topic Combinatorics builds on the knowledge from Mathematics Methods and provides techniques that are very useful in many areas of mathematics, including probability and algebra. The topic Vectors in the plane provides new perspectives on working with two-dimensional space and serves as an introduction to techniques which can be extended to three-dimensional space in Unit 3. These three topics considerably broaden students’ mathematical experience and therefore begin an awakening to the breadth and utility of the subject. They also enable students to increase their mathematical flexibility and versatility.

Unit 2

In Unit 2, Matrices provide new perspectives for working with two-dimensional space and Real and complex numbers provides a continuation of the study of numbers. The topic Trigonometry contains techniques that are used in other topics in both this unit and Units 3 and 4. All topics develop students’ ability to construct mathematical arguments. The technique of proof by the principle of mathematical induction is introduced in this unit.

Unit 3

Unit 3 of the Mathematics Specialist ATAR course contains three topics: Complex numbers, Functions and sketching graphs and Vectors in three dimensions. In this unit, three-dimensional vectors are studied, and vector equations and vector calculus are introduced, with the latter extending students’ knowledge of calculus from the Mathematics Methods ATAR course. Cartesian and vector equations, together with equations of planes, enables students to solve geometric problems and to solve problems involving motion in three-dimensional space. The study of complex numbers is now extended to the polar form. The study of functions and techniques of graph sketching, begun in the Mathematics Methods ATAR course, is extended, and applied in sketching graphs and solving problems involving integration.

Unit 4

Unit 4 of the Mathematics Specialist ATAR course contains three topics: Integration and applications of integration, Rates of change and differential equations and Statistical inference. In Unit 4, the study of differentiation and integration of functions continues, and the calculus techniques developed in this, and previous topics are applied to simple differential equations, in particular in biology and kinematics. These topics demonstrate the real-world applications of the mathematics learned throughout the Mathematics Specialist ATAR course. In this unit, all of the students’ previous experience working with probability and statistics is drawn together in the study of statistical inference for the distribution of sample means and confidence intervals for sample means.

Psychology

Psychology is the scientific study of how people think, feel and behave. It is an evidence-based discipline that follows the principles of scientific inquiry to explore human cognition, behaviour and thought.

This course introduces students to the principles of scientific inquiry and their application to planning, designing and conducting psychological investigations using appropriate procedures and practices. Students have the opportunity to collect, process, evaluate and critically interpret information from a range of scientific sources, and to evaluate the credibility of these resources. Students will develop an understanding of ethical guidelines and their importance to psychological practice.

Students learn how to construct coherent and logical responses to psychological concepts and understandings using appropriate terminology for a range of audiences, demonstrating a critical awareness of cultural and societal values and expectations.

This course is designed to integrate the understanding of the principles of science inquiry, the acquisition of psychological knowledge and the application of both in an enjoyable and contemporary way.

Unit 1 – Biological and lifespan psychology

This unit introduces psychology as an inquiry-based discipline. Students begin to learn concepts associated with psychological theories, studies and models, which develop and change over time, to explain human emotion, cognition and behaviour.

Students learn the basic structure of the central nervous system and some effects of this structure on the way humans think, feel and behave. They are introduced to several methods used to study the brain.

The unit introduces lifespan psychology with a key focus on adolescent development. Students have the opportunity to understand the impact of developmental change on human thoughts, feelings and behaviours. They extend their understanding of developmental processes through learning the role of attachment and identifying stages of development according to specified theorists.

Science inquiry skills developed during Year 7–10 Science are further developed in this unit as students apply these skills to understanding and analysing psychological studies.

Unit 2 – Attitudes, stereotypes and social influence

This unit focuses on the influence of others on human behaviour, cognition and emotion. Students explore the function and effect of attitudes and apply the tripartite model of attitude structure to develop a more complex understanding. Students explore theories of cognitive dissonance, social identity and attribution with reference to relevant psychological studies, and apply these theories to real-world experiences.

The unit introduces social influences. Students learn the role of stereotypes and the relationship between attitudes, prejudice and discrimination in a range of areas. They learn about the relationship between social influence and the development of prosocial and antisocial behaviours.

Students extend their understanding of Science inquiry and the way psychological knowledge develops over time and in response to ongoing research.

Unit 3 – Memory and learning

Cognitive psychology is concerned with the process of how human beings develop understanding and apply this to the world in which they live. Memory and learning form core components of cognitive psychology. Various theories of memory and learning have been developed based on psychological research.

In this unit, students learn the roles of sensation, perception and attention in memory. They further develop understanding of memory by applying models, understanding how specific structures of the brain affect memory, and learning about some of the processes associated with memory and forgetting.

The unit explores theories of learning, including classical conditioning, operant conditioning and social learning theory, in the context of key studies. Students apply learning theories in behaviour modification to real-world contexts.

Science inquiry skills are further developed in this unit, as is the understanding that psychological knowledge develops over time and in response to ongoing research.

Unit 4 – Psychology of motivation, wellbeing and health

A key concern in psychology is developing the understanding of human cognition, emotion and behaviour to inform improvements in the wellbeing of individuals and groups in society. In this unit, students develop a psychological understanding of the relationship between motivation and wellbeing, and apply this to the development of effective strategies related to stress and sleep.

This unit uses analysis of theories and models associated with motivation and wellbeing to establish psychological understandings of these concepts. It introduces some elements of the relationships between stress, sleep and wellbeing. Students learn psychological models and techniques to improve wellbeing in these contexts.

 

Physical Education Studies

In the Physical Education Studies ATAR course students learn about physiological, psychological and biomechanical principles, and apply these to analyse and improve personal and group performances in physical activities. Throughout the course, students learn through integrated written, oral and active learning experiences. The course also provides students with opportunities to develop skills that will enable them to pursue personal interests and potential in physical activity as athletes, coaches, officials, administrators and/or volunteers.

Physical Education Studies- Year 11 ATAR

Structure of the syllabus

The Year 11 syllabus is divided into two units, each of one semester duration, which are typically delivered as a pair.

Unit 1

The focus of this unit is functional anatomy and exercise physiology concepts and how students apply these to their own and others’ performance.

Unit 2

The focus of this unit is biomechanical, psychological and motor learning and coaching concepts and how students apply these to their own and others’ performance.

Organisation of content

The course content is divided into six interrelated content areas:

  • Developing physical skills and tactics
  • Motor learning and coaching
  • Functional anatomy
  • Biomechanics
  • Exercise physiology
  • Sport psychology

Types of Assessment

  • Practical- 30%
  • Written- 70%

 

Physical Education Studies- Year 12 ATAR

Structure of the syllabus 

The Year 12 syllabus is divided into two units which are delivered as a pair.

Unit 3

The focus of this unit is to extend student understanding of acquired functional anatomy and exercise physiology.

Unit 4

The focus of this unit is to extend student understanding of acquired biomechanical, psychological and motor learning and coaching concepts to evaluate their own and others’ performance.

Organisation of content

The course content is divided into six interrelated content areas:

  • Developing physical skills and tactics
  • Motor learning and coaching
  • Functional anatomy
  • Biomechanics
  • Exercise physiology
  • Sport psychology.

Practical requirements

For students studying the Physical Education Studies ATAR Year 12 syllabus, the focus of study must be one or two sports from the prescribed list for the practical (performance) validation. Prescribed list of sports for practical (performance) ATAR course are:

  • Australian football
  • Badminton
  • Basketball
  • Cricket
  • Hockey
  • Netball
  • Soccer
  • Tennis
  • Touch football; and
  • Volleyball.

Assessment types

  • Practical – 30%
  • Theory -70%

This course has an external practical examination.

For more information regarding the syllabus, check the SCSA website

Physics

Physics is a fundamental science that endeavours to explain all the natural phenomena that occur in the universe. Its power lies in the use of a comparatively small number of assumptions, models, laws and theories to explain a wide range of phenomena, from the incredibly small to the incredibly large. Physics has helped to unlock the mysteries of the universe and provides the foundation of understanding upon which modern technologies and all other sciences are based.

Students investigate how the unifying concept of energy explains diverse phenomena and provides a powerful tool for analysing how systems interact throughout the universe on multiple scales. Students learn how more sophisticated theories, including quantum theory and the theory of relativity, are needed to explain more complex phenomena, and how new observations can lead to models and theories being refined and developed.

Students learn how an understanding of physics is central to the identification of, and solutions to, some of the key issues facing an increasingly globalised society. They consider how physics contributes to diverse areas in contemporary life, such as engineering, renewable energy generation, communication, development of new materials, transport and vehicle safety, medical science, an understanding of climate change, and the exploration of the universe.

Unit 1 – Motion, forces and energy

Students describe, explain and predict linear motion and mechanical and thermal energy.

Unit 2 – Waves, nuclear and electrical physics

Students investigate the application of wave models to sound phenomena, radioactivity and nuclear reactions, and investigate energy transfer and transformation in electrical circuits.

Unit 3 – Gravity and relativity

Students investigate models of motion in gravitational, electric and magnetic fields to explain how forces act at a distance. They also examine the Special Theory of Relativity and the consequences of General Relativity.

Unit 4 – Electromagnetism and modern physics

Students use the theory of electromagnetism to explain the production and propagation of electromagnetic waves and investigate how shortcomings in existing theories led to the development of the quantum theory of light and matter.